Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: National Academy of Sciences
    amount: $61,849
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2009

    To support a workshop on the data, analytical, and budgetary resources needed to regulate systematic financial risk

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Scott Weidman

    To support a workshop on the data, analytical, and budgetary resources needed to regulate systematic financial risk

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  • grantee: The Philanthropic Initiative, Inc.
    amount: $25,300
    city: Boston, MA
    year: 2009

    To identify, analyze, and discuss strategies for nurturing mathematical talent among New York City public school students who might not traditionally have opportunities to realize their full mathematical potential

    • Program New York City Program
    • Investigator Joanne Duhl

    To identify, analyze, and discuss strategies for nurturing mathematical talent among New York City public school students who might not traditionally have opportunities to realize their full mathematical potential

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  • grantee: Purdue University
    amount: $84,831
    city: West Lafayette, IN
    year: 2009

    To fund for an additional year the recruitment and retention portion of the Sloan Indigenous Graduate Partnership at Purdue University

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
    • Investigator Kevin Gibson

    To fund for an additional year the recruitment and retention portion of the Sloan Indigenous Graduate Partnership at Purdue University

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  • grantee: Brooklyn Academy of Music
    amount: $20,000
    city: Brooklyn, NY
    year: 2009

    Support for a Phillip Glass opera on Johannes Kepler and supplementary scientific material

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program New Media
    • Investigator Karen Hopkins

    Support for a Phillip Glass opera on Johannes Kepler and supplementary scientific material

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  • grantee: Harvey Wang
    amount: $45,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2009

    To research and write a book about the impact of the digital revolution on the art of photography

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Books
    • Investigator Harvey Wang

    To research and write a book about the impact of the digital revolution on the art of photography

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  • grantee: Advocates for Children of New York, Inc.
    amount: $125,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2009

    To provide valuable quantitative and qualitative information about New York Public Schools at a sustainable cost

    • Program New York City Program
    • Investigator Kim Sweet

    To provide valuable quantitative and qualitative information about New York Public Schools at a sustainable cost

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  • grantee: University of Arizona
    amount: $80,310
    city: Tucson, AZ
    year: 2009

    To fund for an additional year the recruitment and retention portion of the Sloan Indigenous Graduate Partnership at the University of Arizona

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
    • Investigator Maria Velez

    To fund for an additional year the recruitment and retention portion of the Sloan Indigenous Graduate Partnership at the University of Arizona

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  • grantee: Carnegie Institution of Washington
    amount: $4,000,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2009

    To launch a decade-long effort to understand Earth's deep carbon cycle through an international Deep Carbon Observatory

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Robert Hazen

    In December 2008 the Trustees encouraged development of a new basic science program on "Deep Carbon," tentatively described in the Transition Strategy paper provided to the Trustees. With Trustee support, the Carnegie Institution of Washington (CIW) will launch the development of a worldwide Deep Carbon Observatory and serve as its anchor institution. The Deep Carbon Program would address four major areas. First, it would seek to estimate more accurately the reservoirs of carbon from the core, where iron may bind large amounts of carbon, through the mantle where convective cells may carry it upward to the crust which traps the reservoirs that are most familiar to humanity. While some crustal reservoirs may be "biotic," that is, formed from formerly living matter that is buried and cooked in the crust, it is now clear that Earth also contains much larger amounts of abiotic carbon, part of the primordial rock and gas at the planet's origins. Improving estimates of fluxes would be the second major focus of the Deep Carbon Observatory. The third focus would be the origins and synthesis of the particular chemical forms that carbon takes, including methane, which the high pressures and temperatures at great depths make possible. The fourth focus would be deep life. Humanity has never drilled deeper than life. The mud recovered from the deepest holes contains microbes. Geobiologists conjecture that the weight of the "deep hot biosphere" may rival the weight of the surface biosphere. The strategy of the Deep Carbon Observatory proposal draws on experiences of the Digital Sky Survey, Census of Marine Life, and other Sloan science initiatives. Success will depend on development of innovative instruments for working at very high pressures and temperatures. Success will also depend on high leveraging of Sloan funds: the CIW proposal aims to reach $50 million in additional commitments within three years. The leaders of the effort-Robert Hazen, a geologist and superb communicator with broad interests including biology, and Russell Hemley, a top expert in high-pressure instrumentation-have strong worldwide networks and propose the Deep Carbon Observatory with enormous excitement. The highly respected President of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Richard Meserve, former chair of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, has participated directly in the project development and pledged Carnegie's own assets to the effort.

    To launch a decade-long effort to understand Earth's deep carbon cycle through an international Deep Carbon Observatory

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  • grantee: University of California, Los Angeles
    amount: $309,750
    city: Los Angeles, CA
    year: 2009

    For screenwriting and production of science and technology films by top film students

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Film
    • Investigator Etana Jacobson

    This is one of a trio of three-year renewal grants from the nation's leading film schools to continue awarding screenwriting and production awards for science and technology films and to hold an annual science and technology seminar. Many producers are now combing through all the Sloan student winners for new scripts. Our 2008 Sloan Summit, which showcased the work of student winners, attracted executives from the major studios and independent film companies. University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), which had some earlier issues due to personnel changes, has made great strides during the past three years. In the last cycle, UCLA turned in the best performance of any Sloan film school, including two outstanding scripts (The Magic Pill; The Ten Commandments of Leo Szilard). Several Sloan films UCLA submitted to festivals across the country have won awards and one production (Death Strip) took home a Student Emmy. UCLA is now next in line should we support another first feature production grant. While UCLA has increased its film production grants to offset rising production costs and added a modest stipend for more science advisors, it has compensated for these increases with other cuts so there is no net budget increase from 2006.

    For screenwriting and production of science and technology films by top film students

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  • grantee: University of Southern California
    amount: $325,611
    city: Los Angeles, CA
    year: 2009

    For screenwriting and production of science and technology films by top film students

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Film
    • Investigator Michael Renov

    This is one of a trio of three-year renewal grants from the nation's leading film schools to continue awarding screenwriting and production awards for science and technology films and to hold an annual science and technology seminar. Many producers are now combing through all the Sloan student winners for new scripts. Our 2008 Sloan Summit, which showcased the work of student winners, attracted executives from the major studios and independent film companies. University of Southern California (USC) is the oldest film school in the country and consistently competes with New York University for the ranking of number one film school in the nation. It boasts the biggest program among our six schools and is also the only one that gives out a Sloan animation prize. USC has very strong ties with the industry and active alumni involved with the school include George Lucas, Steven Spielberg and Robert Zemeckis. USC graduates have done well in securing industry jobs and enjoy the benefits of a very strong network. USC has been very sensitive to the economic situation and this request is $5,000 lower than the previous request in 2006.

    For screenwriting and production of science and technology films by top film students

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