Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Brave New Software
    amount: $124,770
    city: Los Angeles, CA
    year: 2016

    To improve the discovery, assessment of value, and impact of open source software

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Benjamin Nickolls

    To improve the discovery, assessment of value, and impact of open source software

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  • grantee: Princeton University
    amount: $20,000
    city: Princeton, NJ
    year: 2016

    To develop and test open source software to enable an open review process for academic books

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Matthew Salganik

    To develop and test open source software to enable an open review process for academic books

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  • grantee: American Astronomical Society
    amount: $448,500
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2016

    To advance the discovery, tracking, and preservation of scientific software by improving software citation practices

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Julie Steffen

    Recent technological advances have made it possible to assign Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) to software projects, allowing authors to cite them in just the same way they have traditionally cited a journal article or study. Yet we have not seen much movement toward the actual citation of software by authors—a problem, since citation remains the primary way to acknowledge valuable work among scientists. The problem appears to be cultural, not technical, and it thus makes sense to focus on change at a disciplinary level. Astronomy presents an ideal opportunity to model a best-practice approach to software citation in the sciences. This grant funds an effort by the American Astronomical Society (AAS) to develop and implement a new "software broker" system that would automate the creation and management of metadata about software versions, licensing, and authorship. The move would prompt software developers to fully document their code in structured ways that could easily be imported into discovery tools like the Astronomical Data Service (ADS), which tracks citations across formal and preprint articles and serves as a search interface across the astronomy literature. Though developed within astronomy, most of the systems and workflows to be developed are generic and applicable much more broadly.

    To advance the discovery, tracking, and preservation of scientific software by improving software citation practices

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  • grantee: University of California, Davis
    amount: $20,000
    city: Davis, CA
    year: 2016

    To support a workshop to enhance and extend the functionality of the mybinder notebook computing platform

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Charles Brown

    To support a workshop to enhance and extend the functionality of the mybinder notebook computing platform

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  • grantee: University of California, San Francisco
    amount: $101,858
    city: San Francisco, CA
    year: 2016

    To partially fund the planning and piloting of a preprint service for the life sciences

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Ronald Vale

    To partially fund the planning and piloting of a preprint service for the life sciences

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  • grantee: Wikimedia Foundation
    amount: $20,000
    city: San Francisco, CA
    year: 2016

    To help support a meeting on the citation of academic research in Wikipedia

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Dario Taraborelli

    To help support a meeting on the citation of academic research in Wikipedia

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  • grantee: University of Washington
    amount: $124,370
    city: Seattle, WA
    year: 2016

    To develop up-to-date pricing and quality metrics that enable researchers to better compare Open Access journals to other Open Access and non-Open Access journals

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Jevin West

    To develop up-to-date pricing and quality metrics that enable researchers to better compare Open Access journals to other Open Access and non-Open Access journals

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  • grantee: National Science Communication Institute
    amount: $20,000
    city: Seattle, WA
    year: 2016

    To partially support the inaugural meeting of the Open Scholarship Initiative

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Glenn Hampson

    To partially support the inaugural meeting of the Open Scholarship Initiative

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  • grantee: FORCE11
    amount: $20,000
    city: San Diego, CA
    year: 2016

    To partially support the 2016 Future of Research Communication and eScholarship meeting

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Maryann Martone

    To partially support the 2016 Future of Research Communication and eScholarship meeting

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  • grantee: Hypothesis Project
    amount: $394,465
    city: San Francisco, CA
    year: 2016

    To establish sustainable business models for the Hypothes.is web annotation platform

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Dan Whaley

    Hypothes.is is a web-based annotation platform that enables users to annotate online documents and share their annotations with others. Supported by the Sloan Foundation from conception through prototyping, the platform now has 10,000 regular users and is seeing increasing use among lawyers, journalists, and academic researchers. Interest from the academic publishing community has been particularly noteworthy, as several publishers have developed their own, expensive, internal annotation systems as part of their publication review and editing process. This grant supports efforts by Hypothes.is to move the platform away from philanthropic support and toward independent financial sustainability. Grant funds support the hiring of a head of business development, software modifications that will allow the platform to function on a software-as-a-service model; and the creation of administrative interfaces for client publishers.

    To establish sustainable business models for the Hypothes.is web annotation platform

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