Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: National University of Singapore America Foundation Inc
    amount: $125,000
    city: Sunnyvale, CA
    year: 2011

    Planning grant to establish a South Asian science engagement project

    • Program Initiatives
    • Investigator Surya Sethi

    Planning grant to establish a South Asian science engagement project

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  • grantee: Drexel University
    amount: $100,591
    city: Philadelphia, PA
    year: 2011

    To establish an evaluation infrastructure that will serve as a model for research and practice in institutional, national, and international leadership development programs, particularly those focusing on women faculty in engineering, technology, and scie

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Education and Professional Advancement for Underrepresented Groups
    • Investigator Diane Magrane

    To establish an evaluation infrastructure that will serve as a model for research and practice in institutional, national, and international leadership development programs, particularly those focusing on women faculty in engineering, technology, and scie

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  • grantee: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
    amount: $80,000
    city: Troy, NY
    year: 2011

    To develop the data science and management dimensions of the Deep Carbon Observatory

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Peter Fox

    To develop the data science and management dimensions of the Deep Carbon Observatory

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  • grantee: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
    amount: $50,000
    city: Cold Spring Harbor, NY
    year: 2011

    To help develop a history of the Human Genome Project

    • Program Science
    • Investigator Mila Pollock

    To help develop a history of the Human Genome Project

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  • grantee: Cornell University
    amount: $124,851
    city: Ithaca, NY
    year: 2011

    To support a pilot project to develop appropriate datasets and methodology for examining how different ownership structures-particularly private equity-affect hospital performance and outcomes

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Rosemary Batt

    To support a pilot project to develop appropriate datasets and methodology for examining how different ownership structures-particularly private equity-affect hospital performance and outcomes

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  • grantee: New Jersey Institute of Technology Foundation
    amount: $25,850
    city: Newark, NJ
    year: 2011

    As support for talks, performances, and artistic presentations on the role of beauty and aesthetics in Darwin's theories of selection

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program New Media
    • Investigator David Rothenberg

    As support for talks, performances, and artistic presentations on the role of beauty and aesthetics in Darwin's theories of selection

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  • grantee: Creative Commons
    amount: $250,917
    city: Mountain View, CA
    year: 2011

    To define the main issues and challenges of enabling a large-scale science commons and an achievable strategic plan for Creative Commons

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Data & Computational Research
    • Investigator Catherine Casserly

    The licenses developed by Creative Commons have become an essential set of tools to patch gaps in the international system of copyright, creating a parallel, opt?in intellectual property regime that doesn't require country?by?country legislative change to implement. With those licenses fairly well integrated into modern practice, Creative Commons is embarking on a year?long process of strategic planning to determine where and how they can best have an impact in new areas, including science. This grant provides partial support to Creative Commons as it undertakes this process. Funds will augment a November meeting focused on "open science" and nine months of subsequent work on three key themes: licenses for open-access scholarship, legal and technical infrastructure for open data sharing, and the role of patent licensing in science.

    To define the main issues and challenges of enabling a large-scale science commons and an achievable strategic plan for Creative Commons

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  • grantee: University of California, Los Angeles
    amount: $1,174,129
    city: Los Angeles, CA
    year: 2011

    To conduct ethnographic research of scientific information and data practices

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Data & Computational Research
    • Investigator Christine Borgman

    Funds from this grant to information scientist Christine Borgman and anthropologist Sharon Traweek at the University of California, Los Angeles support a robust, three-year ethnographic research program to study scientific data practices and develop recommendations about needed skills and relationships within scientific teams who collect and manage data. Borgman, Traweek and their research group will will carry out an ambitious "2x2" research program, comparing projects that produce large volumes of homogeneous data with those involving smaller amounts of heterogeneous data as well as projects at earlier and later stages of their life cycles. The four sites to be studied include the Dataverse Network at Harvard, the Center for Embedded Network Sensing, a new National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded center for data-driven science and the transfer of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data from Fermilab to long-term homes at Johns Hopkins and Princeton. The research will help develop a better knowledge about existing data practices in modern science, inform future infrastructure investments, and clarify new roles around issues like data curation.

    To conduct ethnographic research of scientific information and data practices

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  • grantee: University of California, Davis
    amount: $1,500,000
    city: Davis, CA
    year: 2011

    To initiate the research of the team of the Deep Carbon Observatory concerned with basic physics and chemistry of carbon at the extreme pressure and temperature conditions of Earth's interior

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Giulia Galli

    The Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) as a whole aims to achieve transformational understanding of carbon's chemical and biological roles in Earth's interior. A multidisciplinary, decade-long effort, the DCO consists of a distributed but closely coordinated set of observational efforts and analytical instruments united by shared databases and a commitment to open access. The program leaders have set ambitious global goals, for example, to reduce the range of estimates of total carbon in Earth's mantle from a factor of twenty to a factor of two, to establish the techniques that resolve ambiguities about possible biotic versus abiotic hydrocarbon production, to accomplish the first global 3-D census of deep microbial life (presented in interactive 3-D!), and to produce a comprehensive database of thermochemical properties and speciation of carbon-bearing fluids and phases at the pressure and temperature conditions of the upper mantle. To meet its objectives, the DCO has organized into four "directorates," three of which-Reservoirs and Fluxes, Deep Energy, and Deep Life-have already been funded through previous Foundation grants. This grant to the University of California, Davis will provide partial funding for two years of operations of the DCO's final directorate, concerned with the most basic physics and chemistry of carbon in the extreme conditions of the deep crust and mantle. When we think of basic natural science, we may recall subjects from high school and college courses such as phase diagrams and equations of state. A phase diagram is a type of chart used to show conditions at which thermodynamically distinct phases (such as solid, liquid, or gas) can occur at equilibrium. An equation of state describes a state of matter under a given set of physical conditions such as temperature, pressure, and volume. These are the subjects of the fourth directorate. One reason so little is known about the deep carbon cycle is ignorance of the basic physics and chemistry of carbon at the pressure and temperature conditions of Earth's interior. Even phase diagrams and equations of state do not exist for relevant carbon-bearing fluids and minerals at the prevailing conditions deep inside Earth. Over the next two years, an international team led by University of California, Davis physicist Giulia Galli will make observations, conduct experiments, and build models concerned with thermodynamics of carbon bearing systems in the crust and mantle, dynamics and kinetics of deep carbon processes, and mineral-fluid interactions under extreme conditions. Its results, such as the database of thermochemical properties, will be essential for the other directorates and for the success of the Deep Carbon Observatory as a whole.

    To initiate the research of the team of the Deep Carbon Observatory concerned with basic physics and chemistry of carbon at the extreme pressure and temperature conditions of Earth's interior

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  • grantee: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
    amount: $125,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2011

    To provide further support to the Carnegie Endowment's project to develop voluntary Principles of Conduct for nuclear reactor vendors

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator George Perkovich

    With Sloan Foundation support, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace has brokered the development of a voluntary agreement among nuclear reactor vendors to abide by an industry-wide set of principles meant to increase the safety and security of nuclear facilities. This grant funds a year of follow-up activities subsequent to the formal adoption of the principles on September 15, 2011. Funded activities include briefing governments on the final text of the Principles of Conduct; conducting outreach to reactor operators, the World Association of Nuclear Operators, and other stakeholders encouraging them to adopt and abide by the principles; convening a meeting a review meeting to monitor implementation of the procedures set out in the Principles; developing processes to enable sharing of best practices across the industry; and working with nuclear reactor vendors to create an independent secretariat.

    To provide further support to the Carnegie Endowment's project to develop voluntary Principles of Conduct for nuclear reactor vendors

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