Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Center For Independent Documentary
    amount: $315,000
    city: Sharon, MA
    year: 2011

    To support the production of a PBS documentary on "Coming of Age in Aging America"

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Christine Herbes-Sommers

    This grant provides funds for the production of a 60 to 90 minute primetime documentary, Coming of Age in Aging America, to be broadcast nationally on PBS. The documentary will focus on the changing demographics of the U.S. and the challenges posed to American cultural, governmental, and other societal institutions by an aging U.S. populace. The documentary will devote considerable attention to issues of aging and work, including looking at the costs and benefits of working longer, the consequences of various retirement practices on the U.S. social security and Medicare systems, ageism and social biases affecting older workers, and new research on age and productivity.

    To support the production of a PBS documentary on "Coming of Age in Aging America"

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  • grantee: National Academy of Sciences
    amount: $600,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2011

    To study global competition for talent by comparing the high-skilled immigration policies of industrialized nations

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Economic Analysis of Science and Technology (EAST)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Gail Cohen

    Funds from this grant will provide support for a major conference on high-skilled immigration for both researchers and non-specialists. Organized by Stephen Merrill, Executive Director of the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy of that National Academy of Sciences, the conference will concentrate on international comparisons of policies that influence the supply, demand, and mobility of scientists and engineers. An expert committee appointed by STEP, will study this topic in advance of the conference and commission several review papers. Subsequent to the conference, the Academy will issue a peer-reviewed publication featuring feature conference session summaries, the commissioned papers, and a research agenda that can help prioritize future work in this area.

    To study global competition for talent by comparing the high-skilled immigration policies of industrialized nations

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  • grantee: University of Oxford
    amount: $989,739
    city: Oxford, United Kingdom
    year: 2011

    To measure the drivers and dynamics of high skilled immigration

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Economic Analysis of Science and Technology (EAST)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Mathias Czaika

    The decision to emigrate depends both on where the potential immigrant is going and where he or she is coming from. Changes in the conditions and laws in a given country affect people differently in different countries, depending on the conditions and laws there. Yet, when collecting information about immigration, countries tend to be interested only in their own policies, and they tend to track only the total immigrant flows across their own borders. No one nation has much incentive to collect, reconcile, or share detailed information about what is happening elsewhere. This grant to the International Migration Institute at Oxford University supports the work of a team lead by Hein de Haas to compile information about the flow patterns and the policy determinants of high-skilled immigration, concentrating on relocation decisions by students and academics. The project, called DEMIG, studies the "DEterminants of International MIGration" by producing sharable datasets that are bilateral and longitudinal, i.e., that record both sending and receiving information between pairs of countries repeatedly over time. Funds from this grant will allow de Hass and his team to extend DEMIG's Migration Flow Database to include skill indicators like education and employment, and extend DEMIG's Policy Database beyond immigration laws to track factors like fellowship or research funding levels that can specifically influence student and faculty mobility decisions.

    To measure the drivers and dynamics of high skilled immigration

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  • grantee: University of Michigan
    amount: $401,700
    city: Ann Arbor, MI
    year: 2011

    To model how U.S. labor markets for scientists and engineers respond to immigration and other factors

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Economic Analysis of Science and Technology (EAST)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator John Bound

    Do immigrant workers crowd out native ones? How do specific changes in U.S. immigration policy affect scientific and engineering labor markets? Why do foreign-born students and workers who stay in the U.S. decide to stay? How do these considerations vary across scientific fields? This grants supports the work of professors John Bound and Sarah Turner to build well?specified, carefully estimated, and policy-relevant models of how the supply of and demand for scientists and engineers in the U.S. adjust in a global context. Within this comprehensive framework, they will investigate and quantify given factors such as U.S. immigration policies, economic conditions in foreign countries, and U.S. market conditions for tertiary education as these interact with observed factors such as wages, unemployment rates, and flows between specialties in domestic labor markets for scientists and engineers.

    To model how U.S. labor markets for scientists and engineers respond to immigration and other factors

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  • grantee: Fund for the City of New York
    amount: $750,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2011

    To provide partial support for the Sloan Public Service Awards program

    • Program Initiatives
    • Sub-program New York City Initiatives
    • Investigator Mary McCormick

    This grant provides three years of support for the continued operation of the Sloan Public Service Awards. Administered by the Fund for the City of New York since 1973 and supported by the Sloan Foundation since 1985, these annual awards honor exceptional civil servants working in New York City municipal government. Each of the six yearly winners receive a $10,000 award and is honored both in a ceremony at his or her workplace and in a city-wide celebration presided over by the Mayor. Grant funds will support the administrative costs of the program for three years, including the selection process, nominee vetting, press outreach, event planning, and award monies.

    To provide partial support for the Sloan Public Service Awards program

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  • grantee: WGBH Educational Foundation
    amount: $700,000
    city: Boston, MA
    year: 2011

    For broadcast of a 2-hour NOVA special on the discovery and the scientific role of the elements in the periodic table with enhanced digital outreach and mobile application

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Television
    • Investigator Paula Apsell

    This grant provides support for the production and broadcast of a two-hour NOVA special about the elements of the periodic table, their discovery, and the important role they have played over the course of human history. Hosted by author and New York Times technology columnist David Pogue and based on Theodore Grey's bestselling book, The Elements, the NOVA special will cover a broad range of topics, including the organization of the periodic table by Dmitri Mendeleev, how early human technological development was driven largely by our understanding and mastery of metals, and the role rare earth elements currently play in such modern conveniences as cell phones and batteries. Also funded through this grant are digital outreach efforts to broaden the scope and impact of the special, including production of exclusive web-only content to complement the special, expanded activities on social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter, and the development of an interactive iPad app.

    For broadcast of a 2-hour NOVA special on the discovery and the scientific role of the elements in the periodic table with enhanced digital outreach and mobile application

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  • grantee: Connecticut Public Broadcasting, Inc.
    amount: $1,196,390
    city: Hartford, CT
    year: 2011

    For production, broadcast, and outreach for a two-part public television series about what impact the science behind brain scans could or should have on the criminal justice system

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Television
    • Investigator Graham Chedd

    Funds from this grant support the production and broadcast of a two-hour PBS series on how new developments in neuroscience may affect the criminal justice system and our understanding of free will and personal responsibility. Produced by Graham Chedd and hosted by Alan Alda, the series will seek to explain the science behind fMRI brain scans-both its enormous potential and its very significant current limitations-and explore what this new technology could mean for how we determine guilt and innocence. The series will feature commentary from a host of experts-neuroscientists, philosophers, ethicists, legal scholars, and judges- bringing diverse variety of perspectives to the topic and ensuring that it remains both engaging and accessible.

    For production, broadcast, and outreach for a two-part public television series about what impact the science behind brain scans could or should have on the criminal justice system

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  • grantee: The Brookings Institution
    amount: $600,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2011

    To publish through BPEA financial research and economic data that is accessible, reliable, and influential

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Justin Wolfers

    Funds from this grant provide administrative and operational support for the continued publication of the Brookings Papers on Economic Activity (BPEA), one of the premier outlets for policy-relevant economic research.

    To publish through BPEA financial research and economic data that is accessible, reliable, and influential

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  • grantee: University of Maryland, College Park
    amount: $465,272
    city: College Park, MD
    year: 2011

    To compile, study, and openly distribute a nationally standardized database of government health inspectors' restaurant ratings

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Benjamin Bederson

    Funds from this grant support a project by Benjamin Bederson, Ginger Jin, and Phillip Leslie to compile, compare, and curate restaurant health inspection datasets so that they can be freely used by consumers and researchers in many cities across the U.S. The undertaking will involve reconciling the different laws, rating systems, and ranking criteria that preponderate across differing municipal, county, and state jurisdictions, as well as combining large amounts of data collected under varying formats, standards, and protocols. When completed, Bederson, Jin, and Leslie's efforts will not only render health inspection information easier for consumers to access and interpret but also provide a robust dataset for use by economists, sociologists, and other researchers interested in the efficacy of regulation and its effect on behavior.

    To compile, study, and openly distribute a nationally standardized database of government health inspectors' restaurant ratings

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  • grantee: University of Warwick
    amount: $561,672
    city: Coventry, United Kingdom
    year: 2011

    To develop mathematical foundations and applications for the control theory of complex systems

    • Program Economics
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Robert Mackay

    Epidemiologists explain and predict the spread of infectious disease using what they call probabilistic cellular automata (PCA) models. A PCA consists of nodes in a network, each of which is in a state that changes from one time period to the next depending both on the states of nearby nodes and, to some extent, on chance, too. So imagine each node represents a person, and that each person can be in one of three states: healthy, ill, or deceased. Once researchers specify a rule for how likely you are to get sick or die tomorrow given the health of those around you today, they can run the model forward in time and begin to investigate patterns. Such techniques have helped explain how, when, and why to vaccinate, to quarantine, or to take other steps for managing the outbreak of a particular disease. The same kind of model can also describe the spread of financial distress, where nodes represent banks that are connected to other banks through a network of loans or other obligations. This grant to economist Robert Mackay at the University of Warwick will fund a project to convene an international team of researchers to develop theorems, tools, and applicable techniques for constructing PCA models of how financial distress propagates through financial institutions, with the eventual goal of determining how circuit breakers, bailouts, enhanced regulation, or other interventions can mitigate systemic risk.

    To develop mathematical foundations and applications for the control theory of complex systems

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