Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: American Film Institute
    amount: $270,000
    city: Los Angeles, CA
    year: 2009

    For screenwriting and production of science and technology films by the top film students

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Film
    • Investigator Joe Petricca

    This is a three-year renewal grant from the American Film Institute (AFI), one of the nation's leading film schools, to continue awarding tuition stipends, screenwriting and production awards for Science and Technology (S&T) films and to hold an annual S&T seminar. The film school program, supported for over a decade now, has been successful as measured by both quantity and quality of work. Beyond that, it is the cornerstone of our broader film program because it has created a growing body of work-and an emerging cadre of talented filmmakers-all focusing on S&T films. AFI has a unique status as a national film conservatory and their finished Sloan films, such as Skylab and The Monster and the Peanut, traditionally have the best production values and the most sophisticated "look" of all Sloan films. AFI has been very sensitive to the economic situation and this request is substantially lower than their previous request. The Foundation has supported this work at the American Film Institute since 1996 with total grants of $1,301,275.

    For screenwriting and production of science and technology films by the top film students

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  • grantee: Tribeca Film Institute
    amount: $700,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2009

    To develop new science and technology feature films for production and to showcase science and technology films and hold panels at the Tribeca Film Festival

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Film
    • Investigator Beth Janson

    The Tribeca Film Institute (TFI) requests two more years of support for the TFI Sloan Filmmaker Fund and Retrospective Screening and Discussion Series. Our early partnership with Jane Rosenthal and Robert De Niro at the Tribeca Film Festival-of which we were founding sponsors-has yielded several high profile projects that helped establish our film credibility. Tribeca has shrewdly begun pulling together the most promising Sloan projects from other programs, as well as developing its own, to give us the strongest suite of film projects we've ever had. One example is Face Value-the Hedy Lamar story which originated at Tribeca, then went to the Hamptons and came back for a second Tribeca grant last year. It was at our Tribeca selection committee meeting that committee member Darren Aronofsky (Pi, Requiem for a Dream, The Wrestler) read Face Value and recommended his wife, Academy Award-winning actress Rachel Weisz, for the role of Hedy. By attracting people of Aronosky's caliber onto our committees-Marc Abraham (Children of Men, Flash of Genius), Sarah Green (Frieda, Girlfight), John Hart (Proof, Revolutionary Road), Caroline Baron (Capote)-Tribeca has catapulted Sloan into a front row industry seat. Face Value is slated to shoot in January 2010. $280,000 of this request would go directly to filmmakers, one reason for this program's effectiveness. Tribeca is an extremely strong performer, the lynch?pin of our screenplay development efforts, and is a well-regarded, high profile component of the Sloan Film Program. In addition to supporting the Tribeca Film Institute with its screenwriting development program, the Foundation has supported every Tribeca Film Festival since its inception in 2002, with total grants of $2,548,200.

    To develop new science and technology feature films for production and to showcase science and technology films and hold panels at the Tribeca Film Festival

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  • grantee: National Academy of Sciences
    amount: $250,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2009

    Co-funding for a project on The Impact of Copyright Policy on Innovation in the Digital Era

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Universal Access to Knowledge
    • Investigator Stephen Merrill

    The Board on Science, Technology and Economic Policy (STEP) of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) requests co?funding for a project on The Impact of Copyright Policy on Innovation in the Digital Era. We have identified the issues surrounding copyright as critical to our program in Digital Information Technology and the Dissemination of Knowledge but the debate surrounding copyright has been informed by more heat than light. This is an effort by the NAS to bring a more rational and systematic approach to discussions of copyright by expanding research in this area and by identifying a community of researchers with interest and knowledge of copyright to inform broader policy discussions. They would begin by commissioning three background papers: 1) a review of existing literature on the costs and benefits of copyright and related Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) policies; 2) A baseline estimate of the magnitude and categories of U.S. economic activity affected by copyright together with a discussion of the range of business models dependent on its protection; and 3) a theoretical analysis of how copyright might stimulate or inhibit innovation, collaboration, and creativity. The project will also create a public Web site to post papers, comments, and other discussion items regarding copyright. In the spring, NAS would host a day and a half workshop to address and prioritize a range of research topics and methodologies. We are being asked to cover half of the budget. Several Sloan staff would attend this workshop because so little rigorous work has been done in this area, and we believe issues of copyright and intellectual property cut to the heart of our program in Digital Information Technology and the Dissemination of Knowledge.

    Co-funding for a project on The Impact of Copyright Policy on Innovation in the Digital Era

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  • grantee: Swarthmore College
    amount: $313,029
    city: Swarthmore, PA
    year: 2009

    To launch a multi-campus project to improve understanding of undergraduate student migration into and out of science, engineering, and mathematics disciplines

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Science of Learning STEM
    • Investigator Lynne Molter

    In recent years our small program to improve retention and graduation rates for undergraduate and graduate students in STEM disciplines has focused on encouraging campuses to obtain and use good data on STEM enrollments, migration, retention, graduation rates and time-to-degree. Using small officer grants, we funded three projects: At the American Society for Engineering Education, focused on engineering. They are now ready to pilot test a new data collection template. At the Association of Public and Land Grant Universities, focused on time-to-degree. They are now considering what their next step should be. At Washington University, focused on all of these issues for selective public universities, private universities, and private colleges. The latter project, with leadership now transferred to Swarthmore College, has sparked the desire to create and institutionalize a consortium of campuses that collect uniform institutional data and survey students in order to improve understanding of undergraduate student migration into and out of science, engineering and mathematics disciplines. The group will start by reviewing and revising, as appropriate, the data collection template and survey instrument that emerged from the previous, preliminary project. The participating institutions will then initiate regular collection and reporting of data and surveying of students. At this time, fifteen institutions have agreed to participate, many of which were also involved in the preliminary project. The consortium's executive committee continues to recruit additional institutions to participate. Because it is important to have a critical mass of participants, including within each category of institution, if this request is approved, we will not issue the first check until there are at least 16 committed institutions, at least five in each of the three categories: private colleges, private universities, and public universities.

    To launch a multi-campus project to improve understanding of undergraduate student migration into and out of science, engineering, and mathematics disciplines

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  • grantee: Science Festival Foundation
    amount: $600,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2009

    To support the third World Science Festival and to develop a strategic business plan for the future

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program New Media
    • Investigator Tracy Day

    The first two World Science Festivals (WSF), in which Sloan played the initiatory role and then was one of two key early funders, have been major successes. The 2009 WSF sold out virtually every event and achieved massive media penetration. The WSF embodies the Sloan program in public understanding of science and technology and employs many similar modalities. All the institutions of higher learning in New York, along with the major art museums, science halls, cultural centers and performance spaces, play host to this city-wide science festival and bring their traditional audiences into the tent. Co-founders Alan Alda and Brian Greene appeared as hosts and eloquent spokespeople for the value and impact of science in our culture. This new request, at the same level as the first two years, includes $100,000 to support two new Sloan events for 2010 plus $100,000 earmarked for the development of a three to five year Strategic Plan and Business Development Initiative that will focus on the long?term growth, expansion and stability of the World Science Festival. The Foundation has supported the Science Festival Foundation since 2006 with total grants of $1,345,000.

    To support the third World Science Festival and to develop a strategic business plan for the future

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  • grantee: Manhattan Theatre Club
    amount: $500,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2009

    To commission, develop, and produce science and technology plays

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Theater
    • Investigator Annie MacRae

    The Manhattan Theatre Club (MTC), one of the nation's finest and most successful nonprofit theater companies, having received four of the last eight Pulitzer Prizes awarded in Drama, requests a renewal grant of $500,000 over the next three years to build on and expand the Sloan program. The centerpiece of this effort is four annual playwright commissions, three to mid?level or established playwrights and one to an emerging playwright. Sloan's collaboration with MTC is increasingly attracting leading playwrights and the resulting work is playing at theaters across the country. Since Proof in 2000 and Humble Boy in 2003-both MTC plays were supported by Sloan after others had developed them-six new plays commissioned by Sloan have gone on to be staged at major theaters across the country, including Fake currently at the Steppenwolf in Chicago and Intelligence Slave now at the Alley Theater in Houston. The Foundation has supported this work at the Manhattan Theatre Club since 2000 with grants totaling $1,180,000.

    To commission, develop, and produce science and technology plays

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  • grantee: Council on Foreign Relations
    amount: $100,286
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2009

    To fund a workshop on Reassessing Energy Security related to oil and gas

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Initiative Energy Security
    • Investigator Michael Levi

    As part of our exploration of whether to expand our support for research and public understanding of energy issues, we invited the Council on Foreign Relations to request funding for a workshop on energy security related to oil and gas. The workshop will have three important features: It will go beyond the platitudes and misconceptions that often dominate discussions of this subject. It will result in a well considered research agenda for this field that could guide our grantmaking if we decide to pursue the subject further. It will make a special effort to involve young scholars and policy analysts (meaning those under 40) from a diverse set of academic and professional backgrounds as a modest first step in ensuring that new, fresh blood is brought into the field. We believe that this workshop will be very useful and serve as an excellent foundation to help us decide what, if anything, we wish to do further in this field.

    To fund a workshop on Reassessing Energy Security related to oil and gas

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  • grantee: GuideStar USA, Inc.
    amount: $5,000
    city: Williamsburg, VA
    year: 2009

    To support completion of the Form 990 Project

    • Program Initiatives

    To support completion of the Form 990 Project

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  • grantee: The Brookings Institution
    amount: $96,400
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2009

    To advise and oversee the development of software that facilitates public use of demographic and redistricting data

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Investigator Michael McDonald

    To advise and oversee the development of software that facilitates public use of demographic and redistricting data

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  • grantee: George Mason University
    amount: $124,095
    city: Fairfax, VA
    year: 2009

    To demonstrate the feasibility of redistricting software accessibility through a web-browser

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Investigator Michael McDonald

    To demonstrate the feasibility of redistricting software accessibility through a web-browser

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