Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Environmental Defense Fund Inc.
    amount: $350,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2017

    To design and implement a training and networking program that enhances the development of early-career energy and environmental professionals

    • Program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Steven Hamburg

    The Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) employs a substantial number of postbaccalaureate and postdoctoral scientists and economists. These positions train scholars how to undertake policy-relevant science and economics research in an applied setting, outside the university. This grant provides support to EDF to develop a more formalized training, networking, and mentoring program that will train 25 to 30 early-career researchers in the ancillary skills needed to succeed in applied research environments. Training will cover such topics as communications, proposal writing, program management, and team leadership. EDF will also organize a series of workshops that separately target postbaccalaureates and postdoctoral researchers to reflect the different skill development needs among these two groups and will implement a formal mentoring system that will link their postdoctoral fellows with senior scholars across the institution. Finally, EDF’s in-house social scientists will implement a series of surveys among participants to track the impact of this program over time.

    To design and implement a training and networking program that enhances the development of early-career energy and environmental professionals

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  • grantee: National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, Inc.
    amount: $704,328
    city: White Plains, NY
    year: 2017

    To manage effectively and efficiently the Foundation's portfolio of graduate scholarship programs

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Education and Professional Advancement for Underrepresented Groups
    • Investigator Christopher Smith

    Since 2001, the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering (NACME) has served as the sole administrative manager for the Foundation’s graduate scholarship programs for underrepresented minorities, the Minority Ph.D. program (MPHD) and the Sloan Indigenous Graduate Partnership (SIGP). NACME verifies student eligibility, disburses scholarship funds, and tracks student progress. This grant continues support for these and other activities for another three years. In addition to these activities, over the next three years NACME Vice President Christopher Smith and Program Manager Denise Ellis plan to launch several new initiatives related to Sloan fellowship programs, including community building among campuses participating in the MPHD and SIGP, financial analysis of scholarship funds, and reporting on the academic progress of scholarship recipients. In addition, they will begin to administer surveys to supported students both as they join the program and at graduation.

    To manage effectively and efficiently the Foundation's portfolio of graduate scholarship programs

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  • grantee: New York University
    amount: $727,511
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2017

    To further develop the Ph.D. Excellence Initiative to change the face of U.S. economics departments by preparing a select cadre of high-achieving post-baccalaureate students of color for the rigors of Ph.D. study in the field

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Education and Professional Advancement for Underrepresented Groups
    • Investigator Peter Henry

    Led by Peter Henry at New York University’s Stern School of Business, the Ph.D. Excellence Initiative (PHDEI) seeks out promising students of color who recently graduated with a baccalaureate degree in economics and offers them high quality coursework, training, and research experience designed to make them very competitive candidates for admission to top economics graduate programs. Incoming PHDEI students take two courses per semester (tuition is covered by NYU), and receive mentoring and research experience through Henry and participating economics faculty at NYU and other institutions. Grant funds support the administration of the program for four years, along with associated outreach, communications, and evaluation activities. Additional funds support an annual summer conference at which current and former research assistants and PHDEI fellows, joined by supportive faculty mentors, will present their research.

    To further develop the Ph.D. Excellence Initiative to change the face of U.S. economics departments by preparing a select cadre of high-achieving post-baccalaureate students of color for the rigors of Ph.D. study in the field

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  • grantee: University of California, Irvine
    amount: $1,000,000
    city: Irvine, CA
    year: 2017

    To develop an indoor chemistry modeling consortium

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Manabu Shiraiwa

    Funds from this grant support efforts by Manabu Shiraiwa, assistant professor of chemistry at the University of California, Irvine, in collaboration with Nicola Carslaw at the University of York, to develop and lead an indoor chemistry modeling consortium. This two-year project will bring together experts from several different fields to begin to develop a model that realistically represents how buildings influence indoor chemical processes. The team will begin to find ways to link six different modeling techniques that deal with different aspects of indoor chemistry on scales ranging from micro- to macroscale and from very short (less than 1 second) to much longer lifetimes. The modeling consortium plans to address the following research questions: (1) Can we understand indoor chemistry well enough to predict it quantitatively with computer models of chemical and physical processes? (2) What are the major uncertainties that currently exist in these models? (3) What experiments/field measurements do we need to improve our models? (4) What experiments/field measurements do we need to evaluate our models? Models will be developed within the framework of exploring two relevant and highly topical research themes for indoor air chemistry: (1) reactions between indoor oxidants and human skin and (2) cleaning-related emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The research team will also conduct three workshops—at the beginning, middle, and end of the project—to foster collaboration and communication as well as to provide in-person opportunities to review work plans and progress. Six early-career researchers will be trained. The new knowledge and modeling tools will be shared in peer-reviewed publications as well as through presentations at conferences, such as Indoor Air 2018 and the American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) meeting.

    To develop an indoor chemistry modeling consortium

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  • grantee: University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
    amount: $750,000
    city: Chapel Hill, NC
    year: 2017

    To examine the roles of dampness, water soluble organic gases, and surface chemistry on indoor air composition

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Barbara Turpin

    This grant, to Barbara Turpin, professor and chair of the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, will fund three-year effort to examine the roles of dampness, water-soluble organic gases (WSOGs), and surface chemistry on indoor air composition. The project is designed to improve characterization of indoor WSOGs, their chemistry and fate indoors, and to provide key information needed to predict the degree to which water in damp homes may alter indoor air composition. The research will address the following questions by conducting controlled experiments with real indoor surfaces at high vs. low relative humidity: What is the uptake rate and equilibrium partitioning of WSOGs on typical indoor surfaces? How much liquid water absorbs on these surfaces and how does liquid water mediate uptake? The research will also provide insights into surface chemistry and product formation in damp homes by measuring real-time chemical changes on indoor surfaces after the introduction of key gases (ozone, water vapor, and WSOGs) using sophisticated state-of-the-art spectroscopic techniques. Finally, the UNC team will pilot real-time molecular-level characterization of WSOGs in one to three homes using high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) over 15 days. The project will create new knowledge about the roles of dampness, water-soluble organic gases, and surface chemistry on indoor air composition. The research findings will be shared through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at national and international conferences.

    To examine the roles of dampness, water soluble organic gases, and surface chemistry on indoor air composition

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  • grantee: University of Toronto
    amount: $736,035
    city: Toronto, ON, Canada
    year: 2017

    To investigate the role of photochemistry indoors

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator D. James Donaldson

    This grant funds a research project by atmospheric photochemist D. James Donaldson, professor at the University of Toronto, and Christian George, a senior scientist at France’s National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) in Lyon, France to investigate the role of photochemistry indoors. The team plans to establish whether heterogeneous (gas/surface) photochemical reactions occur indoors, producing gas phase oxidants and their precursors, as well as particles. The team plans to address three main questions: (1) Are indoor surfaces of occupied spaces photochemically active in the formation of gas phase oxidants? (2) If so, how do local variables (temperature, relative humidity, specifics of illumination) affect the formation of gas phase oxidants? (3) Is heterogeneous photochemistry a source of indoor particulate matter? These questions will be addressed through a series of laboratory and chamber experiments in both laboratories in Toronto, Canada, and Lyon, France. To facilitate the long-distance collaboration, the team will conduct a series of two-way student exchanges, as well as annual meetings between the principal investigators in Toronto and Lyon. This exchange of students will encourage and support strong international scientific ties at all levels, allowing students to experience different societies and laboratory structures, and better preparing them for transnational activities in the future. This project promises to provide new knowledge about indoor photochemistry. The results will be shared through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at conferences and meetings. At least three undergraduate students, three graduate students, and two postdoctoral fellows will be trained.

    To investigate the role of photochemistry indoors

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  • grantee: Aspiration
    amount: $20,000
    city: San Francisco, CA
    year: 2017

    To support participation in a summit on the sustainability of open source software projects

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Data & Computational Research
    • Investigator Allen Gunn

    To support participation in a summit on the sustainability of open source software projects

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  • grantee: Colorado School of Mines
    amount: $140,000
    city: Golden, CO
    year: 2017

    To examine Biodeterioration and Biocorrosion in Spaceflight Ecosystems: Implications for Material/ Microbiome Interactions on the International Space Station

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator John Spear

    To examine Biodeterioration and Biocorrosion in Spaceflight Ecosystems: Implications for Material/ Microbiome Interactions on the International Space Station

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  • grantee: Arizona State University
    amount: $140,000
    city: Tempe, AZ
    year: 2017

    To develope predictive model systems of polymicrobial biofilm formation and susceptibility to chemical disinfectant:  A longitudinal study with implications for spaceflight systems integrity and health risks

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Microbiology of the Built Environment
    • Investigator Cheryl Nickerson

    To develope predictive model systems of polymicrobial biofilm formation and susceptibility to chemical disinfectant:  A longitudinal study with implications for spaceflight systems integrity and health risks

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  • grantee: New Venture Fund
    amount: $179,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2017

    To encourage charitable giving in support of basic scientific research through Sloan membership in the Science Philanthropy Alliance

    • Program
    • Investigator Bruce Boyd

    To encourage charitable giving in support of basic scientific research through Sloan membership in the Science Philanthropy Alliance

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