Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: University of Rhode Island
    amount: $899,795
    city: Kingston, RI
    year: 2018

    To support Engagement: The Deep Carbon Observatory’s Road to 2019

    • Program Science
    • Sub-program Deep Carbon Observatory
    • Investigator Robert Pockalny

    The core work of the Deep Carbon Observatory’s engagement team, headquartered at the University of Rhode Island (URI), consists of community building and management. The team writes the DCO’s newsletter, maintains a contact database of DCO-affiliated scientists, produces the DCO bibliography, handles educational and outreach partnerships with entities such as National Geographic and the Smithsonian, updates articles about the DCO and deep carbon science in Wikipedia, and conducts all media relations. As the DCO moves toward its planned conclusion in 2019, the engagement team will have additional responsibilities associated with the synthesis of DCO research and the effective communication of its import to the wider scientific community and the public. This grant continues operational support for the DCO’s engagement team for 21 months.

    To support Engagement: The Deep Carbon Observatory’s Road to 2019

    More
  • grantee: Boston College
    amount: $249,626
    city: Chestnut Hill, MA
    year: 2018

    To produce research and inform policy-makers about the role that non-traditional jobs play for older workers

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Alicia Munnell

    This grant will support four integrated research projects on the role played by nontraditional work arrangements—defined as jobs that lack benefits and that have significant wage and hour volatility—in the labor market decisions of older workers. Led by Alicia Munnell, director of the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, three of the projects focus on workers in their 50s and early 60s who may consider themselves too young to retire. The first project examines the extent to which the apparent rise in nontraditional employment for older individuals reflects the loss of traditional jobs to globalization and automation. The goal is to learn how the spread of these pressures to more industries could increase nontraditional work. To the extent that more older workers hold nontraditional jobs, the second project explores how these jobs are part of late-career employment patterns. Do these workers move back into traditional employment, for example—and, if so, after how long—and how often and for how long do they stay in nontraditional work for the remainder of their careers. The third project addresses the question of whether older nontraditional workers obtain access to retirement savings vehicles and health insurance through other sources, such as their spouses, public programs, or their own initiative. The fourth project focuses on an older group of workers—those in their 60s who are old enough to retire but are still working—and examines the extent to which nontraditional jobs help these workers improve their retirement security relative to retiring early.

    To produce research and inform policy-makers about the role that non-traditional jobs play for older workers

    More
  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $421,285
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2018

    To renew an interdisciplinary, postdoctoral training program called the “Sloan Fellowship on Aging and Work” that addresses the challenges of aging societies and labor force participation

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Lisa Berkman

    Funds from this grant provide four years of continued support for a multidisciplinary postdoctoral fellowship program at the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies (HCPDS) at Harvard’s School of Public Health. The Harvard fellowship program is designed to provide opportunities for seminars, mentorships, and speakers, with the goal of catalyzing a Cambridge-based research community for scholars of aging and work that will become part of the growing community of researchers focused on the intersection of aging and work. Grant funds will provide stipend support for two two-year fellowships along with subsidiary funds to support the fellows’ travel and research needs.

    To renew an interdisciplinary, postdoctoral training program called the “Sloan Fellowship on Aging and Work” that addresses the challenges of aging societies and labor force participation

    More
  • grantee: University of Maryland, College Park
    amount: $499,637
    city: College Park, MD
    year: 2018

    To inform the design of questions to learn about alternative work arrangements among the population age 50 plus and provide new evidence on the role of these arrangements in older adults’ work lives

    • Program Working Longer
    • Investigator Katharine Abraham

    This grant funds work by Katharine Abraham and John Haltiwanger of the University of Maryland and Susan Houseman of the Upjohn Institute to bring greater precision to our understanding of how to define and count the “alternative workforce,” and to gain deeper understanding of the roles the different types of alternative work arrangements play in older workers’ lives. Partnering with Gallup, Abraham and her team will field a nationally representative telephone survey of adults aged 18 to 80, asking them about their nontraditional work arrangements. The team will then create a new dataset by linking survey responses with administrative data from tax filings and household surveys. The new dataset will allow the team to probe how alternative work arrangements fit into the labor market behavior of older workers. Questions of interest include whether and to what extent alternative work arrangements are used during periods of traditional unemployment; whether they are a prelude to re-entry into the traditional workforce; the extent to which they are used to supplement retirement income, to offset the risk of 401(k)s, or to balance elder care responsibilities with the need to earn money; and what role the social aspects of work and its capacity to help structure one’s days play in the decision to take up an alternative work arrangement. These questions beg a more fundamental one: are these arrangements positive choices or options of last resort for older Americans? The created dataset will be made publicly available for use by other researchers and the project team expects the project to produce at least two peer reviewed papers, as well as a series of policy briefs and presentations aimed at both scholars and policymakers.

    To inform the design of questions to learn about alternative work arrangements among the population age 50 plus and provide new evidence on the role of these arrangements in older adults’ work lives

    More
  • grantee: Fund for the City of New York
    amount: $810,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2018

    To provide partial support for the Sloan Public Service Awards program

    • Program Initiatives
    • Investigator Mary McCormick

    Each year since 1973, the Sloan Public Service Awards have recognized six outstanding civil servants out of the hundreds of thousands who work for New York City government. The Fund for the City of New York manages the nomination and selection process and refers to the awards as “the Nobel Prizes of Government…, the highest award that can be bestowed upon a New York City public servant.” Nominated by their colleagues and selected by a blue-ribbon panel of distinguished New Yorkers, each of the six winners receives a $10,000 cash prize and is honored at individual celebrations at their workplaces and at a citywide celebration at the Cooper Union. This grant continues the Foundation’s long support of the Sloan Public Service Awards with funding for an additional three years.

    To provide partial support for the Sloan Public Service Awards program

    More
  • grantee: University of Nebraska, Omaha
    amount: $449,423
    city: Omaha, NE
    year: 2018

    To advance understanding of open source project health and sustainability and how people and organizations prosper from open source work

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Data & Computational Research
    • Investigator Matt Germonprez

    This grant supports research by information scientists Matt Germonprez (University of Nebraska) and Sean Goggins (University of Missouri) to develop and test rubrics for the evaluation of the health of online, open source development communities. Building on previous work that resulted in the successful Community Health Analytics for Open Source Software (CHAOSS) project and using a rich dataset drawn from GitHub and other sources, Germonprez and Goggins will investigate how definitions of the health of an online community might rightly vary depending on the type of community in question or type of project being jointly developed, how the injection of money into an online development community influences individual contributor behavior, and how individual decisions by contributors impact overall community health.

    To advance understanding of open source project health and sustainability and how people and organizations prosper from open source work

    More
  • grantee: University of Minnesota
    amount: $526,438
    city: Minneapolis, MN
    year: 2018

    To launch and expand a cross-institutional staffing model for curating disciplinary research data

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Data & Computational Research
    • Investigator Lisa Johnston

    One crucial component of the current and future data workforce is the data curators who steward and curate research data in the interests of reproducibility and reuse. Academic libraries seeking to increase data curation support face a structural problem, however: it’s simply not possible to hire an expert data curator for every discipline. From 2016 to 2018, seed funding from the Sloan Foundation was used to plan a network that could facilitate the sharing of disciplinary data curation expertise across a cohort of partner universities. Funds from this grant support the launch and expansion of this Data Curation Network over the next three years. Initial participating institutions include Cornell; Duke; Johns Hopkins; Penn State; and the universities of Minnesota, Michigan, and Illinois at Urbana Champaign. The grant will support a modest amount of each participating data curator’s time, a network coordinator to be based at the University of Minnesota under the supervision of principal investigator Lisa Johnston, annual meetings of the network, and a business consultant to test business models and plan for sustainability beyond the funded launch period.

    To launch and expand a cross-institutional staffing model for curating disciplinary research data

    More
  • grantee: University of Pittsburgh
    amount: $582,852
    city: Pittsburgh, PA
    year: 2018

    To develop software and services for transforming mathematical results as they appear in journal article abstracts into formally structured data that machines can read, process, search, check, compute with, and learn from as logical statements

    • Program Digital Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Thomas Hales

    Computers do nothing but process logical statements. Mathematics consists of nothing but such statements. It would be reasonable to assume, then, that computers would be adept, perhaps uniquely, at reading, understanding, and cataloging the academic literature of mathematics. Not yet. People and machines, it turns out, speak different mathematical languages. If computers are to help manage mathematical knowledge, they need to be taught how to read math papers. The grant funds efforts by mathematician Thomas Hales to begin that instruction. Hales has raised an international army of graduate students and postdoctoral researchers, which he plans to unleash on the abstracts of thousands of mathematical papers. They will carefully translate the definitions and results that appear in these abstracts into formal programming language. These formalized abstracts—“fabstracts,” for short—can then be used to train machine learning algorithms to “read” textual mathematics.   

    To develop software and services for transforming mathematical results as they appear in journal article abstracts into formally structured data that machines can read, process, search, check, compute with, and learn from as logical statements

    More
  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $241,690
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2018

    To build a research community on the economics of science by holding regular conferences and by other community-building activities

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Economic Analysis of Science and Technology (EAST)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Paula Stephan

    This grant supports the launch and operation of a new working group at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) dedicated to studying the “economics of science.” Led by Paula Stephan, the group will bring together top flight economists to share existing work and findings, identify new areas for research, examine methodological and data issues, and commission new research. Topics include incentives in the current system, how the structure of grants and review systems affects scientific risk taking, the costs and efficiencies of different research funding models, how to judge scientific quality, and how to measure return on investment in basic and applied science. Along with four meetings of the working group, the grant will fund administrative and planning costs, support for small research grants, and partnerships between the working group and institutions like research universities or other science funders.

    To build a research community on the economics of science by holding regular conferences and by other community-building activities

    More
  • grantee: Duke University
    amount: $385,631
    city: Durham, NC
    year: 2018

    To launch an international summer school on Computational Social Science

    • Program Economics
    • Initiative Empirical Economic Research Enablers (EERE)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Christopher Bail

    This grant supports the expansion of a popular seminar on computational social science, run by Matthew Salganik of Princeton University and Christopher Bail of Duke University. The instructional program, which takes place over the summer, involves lectures, group problem sets, and participant-led research projects. The seminar also includes outside speakers who conduct computational social science research in academia, industry, and government. Topics covered include text as data, website scraping, digital field experiments, nonprobability sampling, mass collaboration, and ethics. Interest in the program has been robust, with more than 10 times as many applicants as available slots each year. Sloan funds will allow lectures and course content to be broadcast via interactive video to six new satellite locations, including City University of New York; Northwestern; University of Colorado, Boulder; Seattle; Helsinki; and Cape Town. Additional satellite sites may be added in future years.

    To launch an international summer school on Computational Social Science

    More