Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Ensemble Studio Theatre, Inc.
    amount: $1,920,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2019

    To commission, develop, produce and disseminate new science plays in New York and across the country

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Theater
    • Investigator William Carden

    This grant continues support for a suite of programs by New York’s Ensemble Studio Theatre (EST) to develop, produce, and disseminate new science plays. Each season, EST commissions between 15 and 20 new science-themed scripts from emerging and established playwrights; hosts its annual First Light festival, which celebrates science-themed plays with staged readings, workshops, and other events; sponsors events to bring the theater and scientific community together; makes seed grants to regional theaters around the country to develop science-themed plays with local writers; and produces a mainstage production of one play addressing scientific or technical themes or featuring a scientist, engineer, or mathematician as a major character. Grant funds provide support for these activities for three years.

    To commission, develop, produce and disseminate new science plays in New York and across the country

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  • grantee: L.A. Theatre Works
    amount: $400,000
    city: Venice, CA
    year: 2019

    To record four new Sloan plays for public radio broadcast and online streaming and a 12-play podcast while disseminating 16 science plays to millions of people and thousands of libraries and schools

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Theater
    • Investigator Susan Loewenberg

    Funds from this grant support the Relativity series, a Foundation partnership with L.A. Theatre Works (LATW) to produce, broadcast, and disseminate audio versions of the best science- and technology-themed plays supported by Sloan. Relativity now totals 35 science plays, of which 22 have been commissioned, developed, and/or produced through the Sloan Theater program. LATW productions are high-quality, feature leading actors, and give recorded plays a life well after their theatrical runs. They are broadcast with significantly expanded audiences on more than 50 public radio stations in the United States, on Radio Beijing in China, on the BBC World Service (which reaches listeners in 60 countries from Canada to Australia), and online via free streaming and downloads. Grant funds will enable LATW to record, in studio and live in performance, four new Foundation-supported plays over the next two years. These four plays will be produced into broadcast episodes that will be expanded to include play-related supplemental interviews and features for online streaming and distribution to libraries and schools. During the grant period, LATW will nationally broadcast the four new plays and 12 existing science plays from the Relativity library, reaching an estimated total listenership of three million. LATW will produce two new educational guides to be distributed to 2,000 teachers, reaching an estimated 60,000 middle and high school students. They will also continue their comprehensive marketing and distribution activities for the platform and development of the LATW website and Relativity educational portal.

    To record four new Sloan plays for public radio broadcast and online streaming and a 12-play podcast while disseminating 16 science plays to millions of people and thousands of libraries and schools

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  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $900,000
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2019

    To provide renewed support to examine the processes controlling abundance, sources and fates of organic chemicals indoors

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Allen Goldstein

    This grant supports research by atmospheric chemist Allen Goldstein and environmental engineer William Nazaroff to examine the processes controlling abundance, sources, and fates of organic chemicals indoors. The work will focus on the roles of human occupants, emissions from the building and its contents, and the intrusion of outdoor pollutants as agents influencing indoor air chemistry. In a series of experiments, Goldstein and Nazaroff will characterize organic compound composition of the air in residential spaces, cataloging the relative abundance of volatile (VOC), intermediate volatile (IVOC), and semivolatile (SVOC) organic compounds in both the gas and particle phases, and to compare this composition with outdoor air. They will then analyze how organic compound composition changes across various dimensions: by time, by location inside the residence, and by human occupancy. Their methods will enable them to apportion indoor air organics into major source categories: building fabric and contents, occupants and activities, and outdoor air, with the ultimate objective of understanding the role of emissions influencing indoor air chemistry. This work will advance the state of knowledge regarding the contributions of humans, human activities, surface interactions, and oxidation processes influencing indoor air composition in residences. This new knowledge will be shared through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at conferences and meetings. At least three students will be trained.

    To provide renewed support to examine the processes controlling abundance, sources and fates of organic chemicals indoors

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  • grantee: University of Toronto
    amount: $900,000
    city: Toronto, Canada, Canada
    year: 2019

    To provide renewed support to study multiphase chemistry in indoor environments

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Jonathan Abbatt

    This grant funds research by University of Toronto chemist Jonathan Abbatt, who is trying to forge better kinetic and mechanistic understandings of multiphase chemistry occurring indoors. Abbatt’s work focuses on the oxidation kinetics in both the condensed-phase and volatile products and the effects of oxidation on the gas-aerosol-surface partitioning of semivolatile species. Grant funds will allow Abbatt to use state-of-the-art mass spectrometric techniques in the laboratory to address the multiphase chemistry of a range of indoor surface materials. Abbatt will document what gas-phase and condensed-phase products arise from ozonolysis of the components of skin and cooking oils, characterize the oxidation kinetics and mechanisms of indoor combustion materials, such as cigarette and cannabis smoke, determine the fate of HOCl, an important oxidant released by bleach washing, and investigate how surface oxidation affects the partitioning of surface-sorbed species. Abbatt and his team will generate important new insights into indoor chemistry. This new knowledge will be shared through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at conferences and meetings. At least two postdoctoral researchers and three students will be trained.

    To provide renewed support to study multiphase chemistry in indoor environments

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  • grantee: RAND Corporation
    amount: $599,160
    city: Santa Monica, CA
    year: 2019

    To construct, field, and analyze a new survey to collect information about employers’ incentives and willingness to consider alternate work conditions for aging workers

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Working Longer
    • Investigator Jeffrey Wenger

    While some evidence exists about the types of job conditions that could encourage older workers to remain in the labor force, it is unknown whether and the extent to which those conditions are or could be available in the labor market. Surveys of older workers, for instance, regularly report high demand for workplace flexibility—specifically hours flexibility—as well as other conditions. Yet, employee preferences for job conditions like these are only half of the labor market equation. Substantially less research has been done on the employer side of the equation to understand firm-level incentives and capabilities. This grant funds a project by Jeffrey Wenger and David Powell at the RAND Corporation, in collaboration with a team at the Indeed Hiring Lab that will survey human resource (HR) professionals, hiring managers, and employers to collect information about firms’ working conditions, the variation in those working conditions across workers in the same firm, and the varying on-the-job amenities from which workers can select. In addition to collecting and analyzing these data, the team will construct a set of vignettes that display the tradeoffs between job conditions and wages that firms are capable of and willing to make. This project will produce some of the first evidence about firm-level behavior regarding the willingness of employers to accommodate older workers with specific work conditions.

    To construct, field, and analyze a new survey to collect information about employers’ incentives and willingness to consider alternate work conditions for aging workers

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  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $390,634
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2019

    To improve access to and provenance of research data, software, and hardware from CubeSat missions

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Data & Computational Research
    • Investigator Daina Bouquin

    To improve access to and provenance of research data, software, and hardware from CubeSat missions

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  • grantee: Hopewell Fund
    amount: $1,500,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2019

    To enable networks of academic data science communities to share knowledge, ideas, and lessons learned, thereby facilitating the institutional changes needed to integrate data science into university research and training

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Data & Computational Research
    • Investigator Micaela Parker

    To enable networks of academic data science communities to share knowledge, ideas, and lessons learned, thereby facilitating the institutional changes needed to integrate data science into university research and training

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  • grantee: University of Notre Dame
    amount: $387,826
    city: Notre Dame, IN
    year: 2019

    To improve metadata standards and data management tools for use by researchers capturing data via small unmanned aircraft flights

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Data & Computational Research
    • Investigator Jane Wyngaard

    To improve metadata standards and data management tools for use by researchers capturing data via small unmanned aircraft flights

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  • grantee: Columbia University
    amount: $20,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2019

    To develop and validate new methods of using natural language processing to study how scientific publications inform patentable innovations

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Bhaven Sampat

    To develop and validate new methods of using natural language processing to study how scientific publications inform patentable innovations

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  • grantee: Hunter College Foundation
    amount: $27,292
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2019

    To support 16 performances of Link Link Circus, a comedic science play on the cognitive abilities of animals, written and performed by actress Isabella Rossellini

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Theater
    • Investigator Diana Reiss

    To support 16 performances of Link Link Circus, a comedic science play on the cognitive abilities of animals, written and performed by actress Isabella Rossellini

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