Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Spelman College
    amount: $655,936
    city: Atlanta, GA
    year: 2019

    To address the scarcity of Black women who earn degrees in economics, and grow the number of Black women economists in the professoriate

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
    • Investigator Marionette Holmes

    According to the American Economic Association, only 15 Black Americans received a Ph.D. in economics in 2016. Of those 15, only five were women. This grant supports an effort by Spelman College to meaningfully improve those numbers through a set of interrelated initiatives designed to instill in black undergraduate women an interest in economics as a profession and prepare them to succeed in graduate study in the field. Funded activities include a summer bridge program for incoming freshmen aimed at strengthening participants’ core mathematical competencies; a distinguished speaker series featuring successful women of color who have made a career in economics; initiatives designed to improve the chances of successful application to an economics graduate program, including a journal club, GRE prep training, and a summer program that would provide economic research experience; and facilitated discussions of the challenges women and women of color face in white-male-dominated environments. The program will be supplemented with a scholarship fund that will ensure equal access to program offerings regardless of students’ economic circumstances. Grant funds will support these and associated administrative costs for three years.

    To address the scarcity of Black women who earn degrees in economics, and grow the number of Black women economists in the professoriate

    More
  • grantee: New York University
    amount: $432,364
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2019

    To support screenwriting and production of science and technology films and games by top film and game design students

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Film
    • Investigator Michael Burke

    This grant continues support to New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts for a series of initiatives that encourages student filmmakers and game designers to develop screenplays, short films, and games that feature science or technology. Grant funds support an annual colloquium that brings students together with working scientists, a yearly $30,000 production award that helps a promising science-themed film project move toward completion, three $10,000 screenplay awards given to help develop science themed scripts, and an annual Game Center award to develop an interactive game that creatively integrates gameplay with science and technology. Additional funds provide stipends for working scientists to judge student submissions on their scientific content and to serve as dedicated science advisors and mentors on student projects. Grant funds support these and related administrative and outreach activities for three years.

    To support screenwriting and production of science and technology films and games by top film and game design students

    More
  • grantee: Columbia University
    amount: $351,393
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2019

    To encourage the next generation of filmmakers to write screenplays and produce short films about science and technology through enhanced research, mentorship, and award opportunities

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Film
    • Investigator Trey Ellis

    Funds from this grant provide support to a program at Columbia University’s School of the Arts to incentivize and encourage graduate students to write screenplays and produce short films about science and technology. Supported activities include three annual $10,000 awards given to the best student screenplay with a scientific or technological theme; two annual $21,000 production awards to help produce a science-themed film project; an annual information session and scientific panel that introduces students to cutting edge scientific research, and an intensive competitive mentorship program in which students meet regularly under the supervision of a scientific advisor as they jointly develop science-themed scripts or film projects. Grant funds support these and related administrative costs for three years.

    To encourage the next generation of filmmakers to write screenplays and produce short films about science and technology through enhanced research, mentorship, and award opportunities

    More
  • grantee: Science Friday Initiative, Inc.
    amount: $700,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2019

    To support Science Friday, focusing on science and the arts, including radio broadcasts, digital science videos, blog posts, live events, and associated media

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Radio
    • Investigator Ira Flatow

    This grant provides three years of support for the production and distribution of Science Friday, the only regular weekly show on public radio devoted to all things science. Hosted by Ira Flatow and reaching a weekly audience of some two million through radio, streaming, social media, and the web, Science Friday is a uniquely powerful platform for advancing the public understanding of science. Supported activities over the grant period include production and distribution of 150 radio segments for broadcast; 12 to 18 digital videos; 36 digital pieces in the popular SciCandy series on photography; continued production of the biweekly Science Friday newsletter, Science Diction; the hosting of three live events in the “Science Goes to the Movies” series; and continuation of the Sci Arts Book Club. Additional grant funds support outreach and engagement activities to publicize Science Friday content and broaden its audience.

    To support Science Friday, focusing on science and the arts, including radio broadcasts, digital science videos, blog posts, live events, and associated media

    More
  • grantee: Northwestern University
    amount: $375,000
    city: Evanston, IL
    year: 2019

    To investigate the fundamental chemistry of indoor surfaces using advanced spectroscopy

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Franz Geiger

    This grant funds research by surface chemist Franz Geiger, Dow Professor of Chemistry at Northwestern University, that will investigate the fundamental chemistry of indoor surfaces. Using advanced spectroscopy, Geiger plans to expand our understanding of how indoor volatile and semivolatile organic compounds absorb from air to surfaces; how submonolayer amounts of these absorbed organic compounds convert into indoor molecular, nano-, and microlayers; the propensity of these newly formed layers to interact with oxidants; and how the dynamic response of molecular, nano-, and microlayers to gas-phase species vary with changes in relative humidity. The approach includes both mechanistic studies of idealized model surfaces as well as work on surfaces of samples derived from real-world indoor environments. Results will be shared through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at conferences and meetings.

    To investigate the fundamental chemistry of indoor surfaces using advanced spectroscopy

    More
  • grantee: University of California, Irvine
    amount: $789,771
    city: Irvine, CA
    year: 2019

    To provide renewed support to the indoor chemistry modeling consortium

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Manabu Shiraiwa

    The Modeling Consortium for the Chemistry of Indoor Environments (MOCCIE) is a multi-institutional collaboration devoted to developing comprehensive, integrated, physical-chemical models that simulate how occupants, indoor activities, and buildings influence indoor chemical processes. Founded with Sloan support in 2017, and overseen by Manabu Shiraiwa, Associate Professor of Chemistry at the University of California, Irvine, and Nicola Carslaw, Reader, University of York, MOCCIE links and modifies existing chemical models across a diverse range of physical scales and timeframes. The consortium also partners with experimental chemists working on the indoor environment in mutually beneficial ways. Experimental data can be used to test MOCCIE simulations, resulting in better predictions. These improved predictions, in turn, can then be used by experimentalists to generate hypotheses for further testing. Funds from this grant provide 18 months of continued support for MOCCIE. Over that time, MOCCIE will assess gaps in the fundamental understanding of indoor chemistry processes, guide experimental measurements through identification of parameters responsible for model uncertainties, indicate key species with predicted concentrations, improve design of experimental/fieldwork studies, and aid in interpretation of data from laboratory and field experiments.

    To provide renewed support to the indoor chemistry modeling consortium

    More
  • grantee: Drexel University
    amount: $468,436
    city: Philadelphia, PA
    year: 2019

    To examine the chemical and physical transformations occurring within a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Michael Waring

    This grant funds research by Michael S. Waring, Associate Professor of Architectural and Environmental Engineering and Peter DeCarlo, Associate Professor of Environmental Engineering and Chemistry at Drexel University, that will examine the chemical and physical transformations occurring within a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. Waring and DeCarlo’s work will focus on aerosol and gas-phase transformations, exploring how aerosol processing, composition, and component-based filtration are influenced by extreme and abrupt changes in temperature, relative humidity, and aerosol concentration as air is thermally conditioned and filtered. Utilizing a controllable HVAC system in a Drexel office building, Waring and DeCarlo will make seasonal measurements of the chemical composition of aerosols and trace gases at four locations in the HVAC system—outdoor, mixed, supply, and return air—to isolate the impact of HVAC system aerosol and gas composition. Aerosol composition will be measured using a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer with other instruments capturing trace concentrations of CO, CO2, H2O, O3, NO, NO2. Grant funds also support Waring and DeCarlo’s continued analysis of data collected during 2018’s Sloan-funded HOMEChem field project.

    To examine the chemical and physical transformations occurring within a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system

    More
  • grantee: California Institute of Technology
    amount: $499,424
    city: Pasadena, CA
    year: 2019

    To examine the role of autoxidation in indoor environments

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Paul Wennberg

    This grant supports a collaboration between Paul Wennberg, R. Stanton Avery Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Environmental Science and Engineering, California Institute of Technology, and Henrik Kjaergaard, Professor of Chemistry at the University of Copenhagen, to examine the role of autoxidation (a series of unimolecular processes that rapidly yield oxidized compounds) in indoor environments. Kjaergaard will use computational chemistry methods to diagnose the autoxidation pathways and estimate the rate coefficients for the organic peroxy radical chemistry initiated by the reactions of ozone and the hydroxyl radical with chemicals typically found indoors, especially a suite of terpenes. Complementing this approach, Wennberg will study terpene chemistry in the laboratory to evaluate the computational work and provide guidance for how to extend the calculations to more organic substrates. The pair will publish a suite of mechanistic schemes that describe the chemistry in peer-reviewed manuscripts, present their findings at conferences and meetings, and integrate their work into existing indoor chemical models.

    To examine the role of autoxidation in indoor environments

    More
  • grantee: Yarn Labs
    amount: $1,633,681
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2019

    To enable research on the innovation process, from initial funding through economic impacts, by compiling, linking, and documenting comprehensive datasets about patents and patenting

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Adam Jaffe

    Progress in understanding the relationship between basic research and economic growth requires high-quality data on patents and patenting. Barriers to acquiring, cleaning, and sharing such data remain a significant hurdle to conducting empirical research on a wide range of topics, including the return on investment to basic science investment, the productivity of scientific teams, regulatory impacts on patenting and innovation, and much more. This grant provides funding to the “Innovation Information Initiative,” or I3, a collaborative project to build a linked series of state-of-the-art, open databases that make high-quality patent data easily available to researchers. Led by Yarn Labs, a not-for-profit spin off of the MIT Media Lab, the project will clean and document existing sources of patent data; create new data products that include a catalog of links between patents and products; disambiguate authors, institutions, funders, and titles; and compile patent citations to the scholarly literature. To facilitate use of these new resources, the team will develop user-friendly interfaces and a series of models, algorithms, and other analysis tools. Outreach plans include organizing an annual research meeting alongside the NBER Summer Institute; an annual meeting to coordinate technical matters; and fellowships for Ph.D. students interested in the rigorous study of patenting.

    To enable research on the innovation process, from initial funding through economic impacts, by compiling, linking, and documenting comprehensive datasets about patents and patenting

    More
  • grantee: National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    amount: $963,499
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2019

    To provide partial support for thousands of participants in over 50 programs that comprise the Summer Institute run annually by the National Bureau of Economic Research

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Janet Currie

    The Summer Institute run by the National Bureau of Economics Research (NBER) is an annual gathering of empirical economists that takes place over three weeks of July in Cambridge, Massachusetts. It is widely recognized as the most significant meeting of its kind. In 2018, more than 2,200 economists from 427 institutions participated in at least one of over 50 workshops on a wide range of economic topics, from behavioral macroeconomics to innovation and digitization. Indeed, organizers of the Summer Institute work hard to attract the highest quality research and researchers. The selection process is highly competitive. In 2018, for example, over 5,800 submissions were made and fewer than 10% were accepted. The structure and range of activities taking place at the Summer Institute make it a unique venue for cross-fertilization of ideas. Workshops and lunches are deliberately scheduled to overlap in order to increase the likelihood of interaction between researchers interested in related fields. Participant surveys show high satisfaction with the quality and breadth of the presentations, and appreciation for the opportunity to meet other researchers and initiate new collaborations. This grant provides operating support to NBER to continue to host the Institute for three years.

    To provide partial support for thousands of participants in over 50 programs that comprise the Summer Institute run annually by the National Bureau of Economic Research

    More
We use cookies to analyze our traffic. Please decide if you are willing to accept cookies from our website.