Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Rockaway Waterfront Alliance, Inc.
    amount: $50,000
    city: Far Rockaway, NY
    year: 2021

    To provide partial support for the Environmentor science research internship program

    • Program Higher Education
    • Investigator Jeanne DuPont

    To provide partial support for the Environmentor science research internship program

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  • grantee: Boulder Housing Coalition
    amount: $400,000
    city: Boulder, CO
    year: 2021

    To make energy data more easily and widely available to the academic research community

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Lincoln Miller

    Though federal agencies make high quality data on the U.S. energy system publicly available, the data is often shared in hard-to-use formats that cannot easily be linked with other data or incorporated into the state-of-the-art computational models often used by researchers.  The effort needed to prepare such data for academic analysis is a barrier to use in the energy systems research. The Catalyst Cooperative is a team of data scientists, led by Christina Gosnell, who are dedicated to making unwieldy energy datasets easily accessible for researchers.  Over the next two years, Catalyst Cooperative researchers plan to curate nine new energy-related datasets into their open source data library, including data on electricity generation, natural gas utilities, pipeline safety, electricity market contracts, and greenhouse gas emissions.  Grant funds also support efforts to make needed improvements to their platform to accommodate growth and improve user experience, to help researchers work with this data library, and to perform analysis related to a variety of important energy issues, including planned research on the thermal efficiencies and environmental attributes of power plants. The Boulder Housing Collective acts as the fiscal sponsor for Catalyst Cooperative.

    To make energy data more easily and widely available to the academic research community

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  • grantee: University of Maryland, College Park
    amount: $549,545
    city: College Park, MD
    year: 2021

    To understand the effects of corporate investments on energy technology innovation

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Nathan Hultman

    This grant supports training and mentoring efforts by the University of California, Berkeley’s Initiative on Equity in Energy and Environmental Economics. The goal is to attract a more diverse group of students to the study of energy economics by providing education and training centered on questions associated with distributional equity and just transitions. Funded activities include a mentoring program for undergraduate students of color interested in the distributional dimensions of energy economics, a competitive grant program that will fund ten graduate research projects on issues related to energy equity, and an initiative to hire an underrepresented postdoctoral scholar of color working in energy economics.  Additional grant funds will support a series of networking and convening events to build community across all levels of this initiative and connect supported students to one another and with energy economics faculty at Energy Institute at Berkeley’s Haas School of Business—one of the leading energy economics centers in the country—and Berkeley’s Opportunity Lab.

    To understand the effects of corporate investments on energy technology innovation

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  • grantee: Carnegie Mellon University
    amount: $375,132
    city: Pittsburgh, PA
    year: 2021

    To advance the formation of a national University Energy Institute Collaborative network

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Jay Whitacre

    There are more than 150 academic research centers located at universities across the United States exploring different dimensions of the energy system, all with different topic areas of focus, disciplinary emphases, and level of funding.  Funds from this grant support the creation of a collaboration network, the University Energy Institute Collaborative (UEIC), that will facilitate coordination among these academic research institutes, foster the exchange of ideas, and promote collaborative research. Grant funds will cover the costs of running the network’s subcommittees and communication activities, develop a web portal for members, and planning and holding two annual summits that will bring together center representatives in person. Funds will also go toward the design of a small, seed grant program that would support cross-institutional collaborative projects among UEIC members.

    To advance the formation of a national University Energy Institute Collaborative network

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  • grantee: Houston Advanced Research Center
    amount: $599,946
    city: The Woodlands, TX
    year: 2021

    To assemble a multidisciplinary team of researchers to develop a modeling framework to advance a systems-level understanding of the impacts of climate change on power systems

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Gavin Dillingham

    Climate change is already affecting how energy systems function, with higher temperatures and more intense storms making energy systems more vulnerable overall, leading to a rise in the number of power outages in recent decades. This is evident in numerous recent events, from hurricanes destroying power generation systems in Puerto Rico to California wildfires disrupting transmission lines to the February 2021 Texas blackout caused by extreme cold. This grant funds a multi-institutional research effort led by the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), in partnership with researchers at the University of Houston and Lehigh University, to begin advancing our understanding of how extreme weather events might impact the U.S. energy system. It will examine ERCOT, the Texas electricity grid, and researchers on this project will create an integrated modeling framework, called Pythias, that links together components of five separate models covering separate aspects of energy and climate systems: a power grid management model, a regional climate model, a regional water use and hydrology model, the open source GCAM model that links energy and climate change to socioeconomic factors, and an agent-based decision model to help game out how planners and other stakeholders might respond to changes in energy systems. The team will then use Pythias to model how ERCOT grid might respond to various plausible climate scenarios that could arise in the future.

    To assemble a multidisciplinary team of researchers to develop a modeling framework to advance a systems-level understanding of the impacts of climate change on power systems

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  • grantee: The University of Texas, Austin
    amount: $849,991
    city: Austin, TX
    year: 2021

    To examine the economic and policy dimensions of carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) technologies and create a network of scholars examining critical CCUS research questions

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Sheila Olmstead

    Carbon capture, utilization, and storage technologies (CCUS) aim to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) when it is generated and before the CO2 is released into the atmosphere.  The captured CO2 is subsequently stored or re-used in ways that do not involve putting it back in the air. CCUS technologies seem promising in theory, but uptake has been sluggish due to a variety of factors, including high upfront costs, poorly developed markets for captured CO2, and policies that provide inadequate incentives for adoption. This grant funds a multidisciplinary team of scholars, led by Sheila Olmstead, from the University of Texas, Austin and the University of Wyoming to launch four studies designed to address a range of issues related to CCUS. In the first, the project team will analyze and compare various policy interventions aimed at mitigating the high up-front costs of installing CCUS systems. In the second, the team will identify and analyze the frictions that inhibit coordination between power plant owners, pipeline developers, geologic storage managers, and CO2 utilization customers, and it will analyze the costs and benefits of different policies to ease those frictions. Third, the team will examine current tax policies designed to incentivize CCUS update and compare their efficacy to other possible policies, like a carbon tax or emissions standards. Fourth, the team will model the potential impacts of increased adoption of CCUS across different regions, with a particular focus on the effects on underrepresented and marginalized populations. In addition to their own research, the UT Austin and University of Wyoming teams will use grant funds to spur further research on these topics by holding an open call for projects to be undertaken by scholars at other institutions that will be supported through a small sub-award program. A final workshop will be held for all scholars involved over the course of the project to share methods and findings.

    To examine the economic and policy dimensions of carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) technologies and create a network of scholars examining critical CCUS research questions

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  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $499,770
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2021

    To train a diverse cohort of early career energy economists through the Berkeley Initiative on Equity in Energy and Environmental Economics

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Meredith Fowlie

    This grant supports efforts by the University of California, Berkeley’s Initiative on Equity in Energy and Enviromental Economics, to attract a more diverse group of students to the study of energy economics, and to provide education and training that will prepare these students for success in graduate study and careers in professional energy economics.  Funded activities include a mentoring program for underrepresented graduate students of color, a competitive grant program that will fund ten graduate research projects on issues related to energy equity, and an initiative to hire an underrepresented postdoctoral scholar of color working in energy economics.  Additional grant fund will support a series of networking and convening events to build community across all levels of this initiative to connect supported students to one another and with energy economics faculty at Energy Institute at Berkeley’s Haas School of Business—one of the leading energy economics centers in the country—and Berkeley’s Opportunity Lab.

    To train a diverse cohort of early career energy economists through the Berkeley Initiative on Equity in Energy and Environmental Economics

    More
  • grantee: University of Colorado, Boulder
    amount: $574,444
    city: Boulder, CO
    year: 2021

    To build an inclusive and diverse community around standards for and the review of scientific Python open source software (OSS)

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Leah Wasser

    The review process for software is analogous to but in some ways different from a manuscript review; in addition to assessing the integrity of the methods manifested in the software’s algorithms, reviewers can consider features of the code itself and how well it is “bundled” for use by others. Does it run well under varying conditions? How interoperable is it with other platforms? What is the quality of its documentation? Such review is important for two main reasons. First, software that receives high marks by reputable reviewers lowers barriers to use.  Scientists can trust that well-reviewed code is robust, trustworthy, and easy to implement, even if they did not write the code themselves.  Second, well-regarded software reviews (and citations) can signal value and thus increase the incentives for software engineers and others to develop and maintain research software.  This grant funds a project by ecologist and data scientist Leah Wasser to further advance research software review in Python, arguably the dominant programming language for data science. pyOpenSci will mimic many of the core functions of the rOpenSci ecosystem including a grassroots process to develop common community standards, a transparent review process that leverages critical tooling from the Journal of Open Source Software, and efforts to build a strong, well-connected, diverse network of developers, engineers, and working scientists committed to the project.

    To build an inclusive and diverse community around standards for and the review of scientific Python open source software (OSS)

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  • grantee: Atlanta University Center Consortium
    amount: $249,994
    city: Atlanta, GA
    year: 2021

    To pilot postbaccalaureate training in open source software development for Black students and infuse open source skills into HBCU curricula

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Talitha Washington

    To pilot postbaccalaureate training in open source software development for Black students and infuse open source skills into HBCU curricula

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  • grantee: University of California, San Diego
    amount: $350,000
    city: La Jolla, CA
    year: 2021

    To study the effects of parallel digital platforms and censorship on transnational collaboration in science and technology

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Exploratory Grantmaking in Technology
    • Investigator Margaret Roberts

    One of the promises of digital information technology is fast and frictionless communication.  Powered by data sharing and collaboration platforms, the vision of the 21st century knowledge economy is one where a lab in Johannesburg can partner with one in Jaipur, with corresponding increases in global productivity and decreases in unnecessary, duplicative work.  In practice, frictions continue to exist that impede the flow of knowledge across national and platform borders. This grant funds efforts by political scientist Margaret Roberts and economist Ruixue Jia at the University of California San Diego to study how policies that sever transnational exchange and flows of information goods impact collaboration, scientific progress, and innovation.  Roberts and Jia will study the impacts of impediments to information sharing and their impacts on collaboration, including censorship of knowledge-sharing and collaboration platforms, the launch of substitutes to these platforms, and policies that discourage international collaboration. Using a rich multi-method approach that involves observational study, analysis of natural experiments, original field experiments, and interviews with scientists, the team will examine how platforms for collaboration and their breakdown has affected citation, information sharing, and innovation rates.

    To study the effects of parallel digital platforms and censorship on transnational collaboration in science and technology

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