Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: The Futuro Media Group
    amount: $235,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2019

    To support four short animated documentary films and related outreach about little-known women in STEM fields as part of a multimedia series about great women distributed digitally and broadcast on PBS American Masters

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program New Media
    • Investigator Charlotte Mangin

    To support four short animated documentary films and related outreach about little-known women in STEM fields as part of a multimedia series about great women distributed digitally and broadcast on PBS American Masters

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  • grantee: PRX Incorporated
    amount: $75,000
    city: Boston, MA
    year: 2019

    To support a one-day symposium on the emerging systemic threats to the openness of podcasting, including corporate consolidation and data privacy

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Radio
    • Investigator Andrew Kuklewicz

    To support a one-day symposium on the emerging systemic threats to the openness of podcasting, including corporate consolidation and data privacy

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  • grantee: Cornell University
    amount: $131,366
    city: Ithaca, NY
    year: 2019

    To research the effect of franchising on the labor market outcomes of managers and frontline employees

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Outsourcing
    • Investigator Rosemary Batt

    To research the effect of franchising on the labor market outcomes of managers and frontline employees

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  • grantee: North Carolina State University
    amount: $249,957
    city: Raleigh, NC
    year: 2019

    To study the effects of an aging labor force on firms’ decision to modify employment conditions and compensation programs

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Working Longer
    • Investigator Robert Clark

    To study the effects of an aging labor force on firms’ decision to modify employment conditions and compensation programs

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  • grantee: National Academy of Sciences
    amount: $25,000
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2019

    To support a planning meeting for a consensus study on the environmental health implications of emerging indoor chemistry research

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Chemistry of Indoor Environments
    • Investigator Marilee Shelton-Davenport

    To support a planning meeting for a consensus study on the environmental health implications of emerging indoor chemistry research

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  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $677,783
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2019

    To develop and promulgate best practices in the review of statistical research software

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Karthik Ram

    Supported by the Sloan Foundation since 2013, rOpenSci is an open source community that develops research software inside the R computing environment, especially focusing on the creation of expansions and modifications of R useful to the research scientist. The rOpenSci community has become known for high-quality, trusted research software, largely because every user-developed package is run through a robust peer review process before it is added to the rOpenSci suite. Increased access to basic data science skills combined with the demand for research software has led to rapid growth in software packages, many of which implement statistical methods. A large proportion of these software packages are highly variable in quality and lack appropriate tests to ensure that the software produces correct results consistently, across a variety of conditions. Much of this is due to the lack of clear standards (within and across fields) and guidance on how to implement them. Funds from this grant support a two-year effort to address this pressure on two fronts: to extend the rOpenSci model of scientific software peer review into substantial assessment of the implementation of statistical methods, and to build out a technical infrastructure to manage this expanded review process.

    To develop and promulgate best practices in the review of statistical research software

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  • grantee: University of California, Berkeley
    amount: $280,942
    city: Berkeley, CA
    year: 2019

    To develop new interfaces for scientific literature that include context-relevant explanations of technical terms and notation

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Marti Hearst

    Whether you call it machine learning, deep learning, or AI, a new set of methods at the interface of statistics and computer science are being applied to research across the sciences. A consequence of the excitement about these new methods is that disciplinary researchers eager to use them in their research must both get up to speed quickly and maintain an awareness of a new literature, one which is moving at high volume and velocity. Increased interest in the AI literature, however, comes just as that literature is getting harder to read thanks to a combination of short publish-response cycles and rapidly evolving norms about what should be cited and explained in a given paper. This grant funds a project by computer scientist Marti Hearst to develop interfaces to the AI literature that offer additional context and support for readers not deeply acquainted with the field. Hearst’s lab will develop algorithms and software to help readers see the meanings of symbols and terms anywhere in the text of a given article, regardless of where they are defined, and pull in explanations from papers in the co-citation network of the paper being read where definitions are not present in the text itself. The resulting software, implemented in a lightweight interface that integrates with PDF readers to ensure wide adoption, will be of value to researchers across the sciences who are adopting machine learning methods.

    To develop new interfaces for scientific literature that include context-relevant explanations of technical terms and notation

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  • grantee: Dryad
    amount: $635,915
    city: Durham, NC
    year: 2019

    To support the integration of both community and technology initiatives in a central data curation hub for both researchers and institutions

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Scholarly Communication
    • Investigator Melissanne Scheld

    This grant supports the expansion of Dryad, a well-respected nonprofit and open source data repository that has focused on the deposit and curation of datasets in fields lacking a disciplinary data repository. Partnering with the University of California’s California Digital Library and CERN’s Zenodo repository, Dryad aims to develop a community data curation and publication platform driven by researcher needs and institutional values. The envisioned expansion will integrate Dryad with other software systems commonly used by researchers across the academic research and publication pipeline, including Jupyter, rOpenSci, DataSeer, ScholarOne, and Editorial Manager. Additional funds will support a partnership with Zenodo to integrate the two systems, supporting publishers and researchers, and allowing for triaged deposits to best practice repositories based on content type.

    To support the integration of both community and technology initiatives in a central data curation hub for both researchers and institutions

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  • grantee: American Geophysical Union
    amount: $930,200
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2019

    To address sexual harassment and other related matters that affect gender inclusion through new educational resources and validated measurement tools

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
    • Investigator Billy Williams

    Funds from this grant support a major initiative by the American Geophysical Union (AGU) to increase gender inclusion and reduce sexual and gender harassment in the academic STEM research community, generally, and in the geosciences in particular. Partnering with the National Center for Professional Research Ethics (NCPRE), the AGU will expand the influential SOURCE assessment system, a series of tools and services that allow universities to assess their research ethics climates at the departmental level and to benchmark their own practices against those of their institutional peers. AGU will work with NCPRE to expand and adapt SOURCE so it can be used to effectively assess university work environments for their degree of gender inclusion and their tolerance of sexual or gender harassing behaviors. AGU and NCPRE will then work to raise awareness of the new SOURCE capabilities and to spur adoption by universities. In addition, AGU will launch several new services aimed at helping its members implement more effective anti-sexual harassment policies and inculcate more thriving cultures of gender inclusion. This will include yearly training workshops, production of a series of scenario-based web videos that provide practical training for dealing with issues of sexual harassment and gender exclusivity, and a leadership development program with an emphasis on effectively leading on ethics, diversity, and inclusion issues.

    To address sexual harassment and other related matters that affect gender inclusion through new educational resources and validated measurement tools

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  • grantee: Social Science Research Council
    amount: $2,200,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2019

    To provide mentoring, networking and professional development services to Sloan MPHD graduates through the Sloan Scholars Mentoring Network (SSMN), and to review the impacts of the SSMN and MPHD as Sloan Scholars move through their careers

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
    • Investigator Ron Kassimir

    Operated by the Social Science Research Council, the Sloan Scholars Mentoring Network (SSMN) is an alumni organization for graduates of Sloan’s Minority Ph.D. program. SSMN provides networking and continued professional development opportunities for those alumni who continue to work in academia. The network also provides a means for the Foundation to follow the careers of program graduates and thus to help in assessing its impact. SSMN offerings include a directory with up-to-date information on the 1,124 graduates of the Minority Ph.D. program, a digital newsletter featuring relevant community news as well as long-form interviews and short spotlight pieces highlighting the achievements of Sloan Scholar alumni, a boot camp for early-career academics, a skill-development webinar series, a biennial leadership program for tenured alumni, and a grants program that provides travel or research funding for selected program graduates. Additional funds will support initial work exploring whether and how the network might be expanded to provide services to the roughly 40 percent of Sloan alumni who work outside academia.

    To provide mentoring, networking and professional development services to Sloan MPHD graduates through the Sloan Scholars Mentoring Network (SSMN), and to review the impacts of the SSMN and MPHD as Sloan Scholars move through their careers

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