Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Northern Arizona University
    amount: $499,750
    city: Flagstaff, AZ
    year: 2021

    To create long-term, equity-oriented systemic change through a partnership across institutions (NAU Mountain Campus, NAU Yuma Campus, and Dinй College) aimed at reducing racial disparities in STEM graduate pathways

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
    • Investigator Catherine Propper

    This grant supports a series of initiatives led by Catherine Propper at North Arizona University (NAU) to facilitate both the recruitment of Indigenous and Latina/o students into STEM graduate education programs at NAU and transform graduate education at NAU toward a more student-centered educational model that is oriented toward student success.  The primary effort will be the creation of a cohort-based bridge program between NAU and partners Dinй College, a tribal college operated by the Navajo Nation, and NAU-Yuma, a Hispanic Serving Institution whose student body is drawn largely from the largely Latina/o population around Yuma, Arizona.  Using structured mentoring, course exchanges, retreats, and other curricular and programmatic efforts, the program will attempt to facilitate a pipeline bringing undergraduates from Dinй and Yuma into STEM master’s degree programs at the NAU main campus.  Other planned efforts include revising graduate admissions processes in order to be more inclusive and to increase diversity across the institutions, ongoing faculty training in order to transform relationships and environments in labs and classrooms, and engaging family members in order to ensure a holistic approach to student success. 

    To create long-term, equity-oriented systemic change through a partnership across institutions (NAU Mountain Campus, NAU Yuma Campus, and Dinй College) aimed at reducing racial disparities in STEM graduate pathways

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  • grantee: Georgia State University Research Foundation
    amount: $499,964
    city: Atlanta, GA
    year: 2021

    To establish a “Math Path Program” at GSU that supports the recruitment, retention, and progression of undergraduates from diverse backgrounds in pathways to quantitative science graduate programs around the nation

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
    • Investigator Kyle Frantz

    This grant supports an initiative at Georgia State University (GSU) to create an innovative program designed to further the recruitment, persistence, and progression of Black, Indigenous, and Latina/o undergraduates into quantitative science graduate programs around the nation.  Created in partnership with the National Math Alliance, the “Math Path Program” is comprised of numerous components.  The program will include a structured math mentoring program that will automatically opt-in all first-year GSU math students.  First-year majors in math-heavy disciplines like statistics or physics will also be invited and encouraged to participate, with a particular focus on including Black, Indigenous, and Latina/o students. GSU will also launch a summer internship program, develop a series of mentored math teams for second-year students, work with the National Math Alliance to develop programming that facilitates the graduate application process, and create a graduate school “transition grant” that will defray site visits, moving costs, and other expenses for students who apply and attend STEM graduate programs.  Partnering with GSU in the effort are a series of graduate programs at Arizona State University, Georgia Institute of Technology, University of Michigan, University of Minnesota, and Purdue University, who collectively offer a diverse variety of graduate programs where GSU students may choose to continue their education.

    To establish a “Math Path Program” at GSU that supports the recruitment, retention, and progression of undergraduates from diverse backgrounds in pathways to quantitative science graduate programs around the nation

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  • grantee: The Metropolitan Museum of Art
    amount: $791,882
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2021

    To support a New York-area network of museum partners focused on scientific research in the fields of cultural heritage and art conservation through access to expert researchers and advanced equipment

    • Program New York City Program
    • Investigator Marco Leona

    Founded in 2016 through a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and housed at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, the New York Network Initiative for Conservation Science (NY-NICS) offers access to expert conservation science researchers and state-of-the-art instruments to cultural heritage institutions across the city.  Anchored in material science and chemistry, conservation science as a field is broadly engaged in applying contemporary imaging and analytic techniques to questions of the history of artistic practice, which can range from the adoption of new materials over time to the creative processes of individual artists. Led by Marco Leona, NY-NICS has spearheaded partnerships with 11 key NYC cultural institutions since its founding, including the Brooklyn Museum, the Frick Collection, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the American Museum of Natural History, and the New York Public Library. This grant joins the Mellon Foundation in its support for the continued operation and expansion of the NY-NICS, allowing it to hire additional staff, expand the network further, and grow its list of partnerships with a particular eye on important but less well-resourced cultural institutions in New York. 

    To support a New York-area network of museum partners focused on scientific research in the fields of cultural heritage and art conservation through access to expert researchers and advanced equipment

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  • grantee: SFFILM
    amount: $467,500
    city: San Francisco, CA
    year: 2021

    To nurture, develop, and champion films that explore scientific or technological themes and characters

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Film
    • Investigator Anne Lai

    This grant provides continuing support for a series of activities by SFFILM, the organization that hosts the annual SFFILM Festival, to nurture, develop, and champion films that explore scientific or technological themes and characters. Supported activities include the awarding of two $35,000 Sloan Science in Cinema Fellowships each year to promising feature film or episodic screenwriters who are exploring scientific or technological themes in their work. SFFILM also gives an annual award, the Sloan Science in Cinema Prize, to the best science-themed feature film submitted to the San Francisco Film Festival and promotes the winning film at the festival with a ceremony, screening, post-screening panel, and reception. SFFILM compiles the Sloan Stories of Science Sourcebook, which includes the best science stories and the most up-to-date scientific discoveries of the year and offers awards to two filmmakers who can develop original scripts based on these stories or ideas. Lastly, SFFILM partners with the Black List to identify promising science-themed scripts and bring them to the attention of developers, producers, and other film industry executives. Grant funds support these activities and associated operational costs for the next two years.

    To nurture, develop, and champion films that explore scientific or technological themes and characters

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  • grantee: Manhattan Theatre Club
    amount: $710,000
    city: New York, NY
    year: 2021

    To support the MTC/Sloan Initiative commissioning, developing, and producing new science and technology plays

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Theater
    • Investigator Scott Kaplan

    This grant continues a signature partnership with New York City’s acclaimed Manhattan Theatre Club (MTC) to commission, develop, and produce science and technology plays. Over the next three years, MTC will commission between 15 and 18 new plays from both rising and established playwrights that explore scientific themes or feature scientists, engineers, inventors, or mathematicians as major characters. Commissions are selected twice yearly in consultation with an independent scientific advisory panel that serves as a year-round resource to help playwrights ensure scientific accuracy. In addition to the commissions, grant funds will support three to four readings or workshops for Foundation-commissioned plays per year, and one annual presentation of a Foundation-developed play before a public audience of over 100 people as part of the Ted Snowdon Reading Series.

    To support the MTC/Sloan Initiative commissioning, developing, and producing new science and technology plays

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  • grantee: Carnegie Mellon University
    amount: $286,551
    city: Pittsburgh, PA
    year: 2021

    To support the development and production of science and technology films, television, and new media projects by top film students

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Film
    • Investigator Robert Handel

    This grant provides three additional years of support for a program at the Carnegie Mellon University School of Drama (CMU) that exposes top dramatic writing students to science and technology and awards prizes to student screenwriters who write science- or technology-themed scripts. The CMU program includes a fall symposium that brings scientists to the drama school to introduce students to recent developments in a variety of scientific disciplines; a year-long screenwriting workshop that meets weekly and focuses on the challenges and opportunities posed by incorporating science into dramatic or comedic narratives, a mentorship program that pairs film students with working scientists to help them depict science accurately in their work, an annual screenwriting competition that awards $45,000 total per year to the three best science-themed scripts submitted, and a yearly showcase in Los Angeles and New York to bring student filmmakers into contact with leading producers, directors, and distributors in the film and television industry.

    To support the development and production of science and technology films, television, and new media projects by top film students

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  • grantee: Sundance Institute
    amount: $500,000
    city: Los Angeles, CA
    year: 2021

    To support a science and technology film program at the nation's pre-eminent independent film center that includes screenwriting fellowships, feature film prizes, science and film panels, and associated outreach

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Film
    • Investigator Michelle Satter

    The Sundance Film Institute hosts the Sundance Film Festival, the largest and most prestigious showcase of independent cinema in the U.S.  First held in 1978, the festival remains the first choice for both emerging and established independent filmmakers to premiere their work and an offers an unrivaled venue to showcase innovative filmmaking at the intersection of science and cinema. This grant supports a suite of awards and activities each year that have resulted in a widely recognized and fruitful 20-year partnership: the Sloan Commissioning Grant; the Sloan Episodic Fellowship; the Sloan Development Fellowship; the annual Alfred P. Sloan Feature Film Prize (one of only six juried prizes at the Festival); a high-profile panel discussion with scientists and filmmakers; and a reception celebrating the Sloan winners at the Festival.

    To support a science and technology film program at the nation's pre-eminent independent film center that includes screenwriting fellowships, feature film prizes, science and film panels, and associated outreach

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  • grantee: Coolidge Corner Theatre Foundation
    amount: $763,100
    city: Brookline, MA
    year: 2021

    To sustain and expand the national Science on Screen program

    • Program Public Understanding
    • Sub-program Film
    • Investigator Katherine Tallman

    The Coolidge Corner Theatre is an independent cinema in Brookline, Massachusetts specializing in international, documentary, animated, and independent film selections. The Coolidge is also the leader of Science on Screen, a nationwide network of independent cinemas that invite scientific experts to screenings of popular or cult classic films to discuss with audiences the scientific or technological themes or issues the film raises. The series offers an unexpected, informative, and entirely fun entree into the relationship between science and film. Previous events used the zombie classic Night of the Living Dead as a springboard to discuss the role of the amygdala in cognitive processes and a screening of Fight Club as the beginning of the discussion of the roots of aggression. Grant funds will allow the Coolidge to make grants to 56 local theatres, bringing the total number of independent cinema houses that have participated in Science on Screen to well over 100. In addition, the Coolidge will promote the series through a new digital newsletter, a video for the National Week of Science on Screen, partnerships and sponsorships, and online marketing efforts.

    To sustain and expand the national Science on Screen program

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  • grantee: Harvard University
    amount: $750,000
    city: Cambridge, MA
    year: 2021

    To develop a sustainable open source library of tools and community dedicated to privacy-preserving data analysis

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Empirical Economic Research Enablers (EERE)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Salil Vadhan

    The mathematical theory of differential privacy describes methods and practices that allow researchers to query sensitive datasets while controlling how much each query compromises the privacy of individuals contained in the dataset. This approach represents the cutting edge of privacy-protection, but one that is mathematically subtle and challenging to implement. Widespread use of these methods will require lowering the cost of adoption and adaptation.  OpenDP  is therefore producing a tested, trustworthy, interoperable, and flexible library of software that will make it easier for users to set up differentially private access to sensitive data. This grant provides continuing support for Harvard computer scientist Salil Vadhan, creator of OpenDP, as well as a dedicated community of theorists, engineers, practitioners, and privacy experts that is aiming to increase adoption of differential privacy. Now in its third year, OpenDP is shifting from a minimum viable product to a prospering ecosystem with heightened impact and broadened support. Specifically, grant funds allow Vadhan to expand OpenDP’s library capabilities to meet new application needs; promote OpenDP adoption among social science researchers; and further strengthen the growing community of experts using and contributing to OpenDP.  Eventually, OpenDP will serve as a sustainable open-source library of tools and community dedicated to privacy-preserving data analysis.

    To develop a sustainable open source library of tools and community dedicated to privacy-preserving data analysis

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  • grantee: FPF Education and Innovation Foundation
    amount: $385,292
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2021

    To accelerate the safe and responsible sharing of administrative data between companies and academic researchers

    • Program Research
    • Initiative Empirical Economic Research Enablers (EERE)
    • Sub-program Economic Institutions, Behavior, & Performance
    • Investigator Sara Jordan

    The value of letting independent social scientists study the administrative data collected by companies of all sorts is hardly in doubt. Economists are particularly keen on basing hypotheses, models, and economic indicators on such information. Companies are often reluctant to share their data, however, in part due to concerns regarding data privacy, costs, inconvenience, reputational risk, or ethical issues. Recent regulatory measures, which give users control over their data, complicate matters even further. Without better data sharing mechanisms, we may soon live in a world where only a few large companies have access to that data and the insights such information provides. This grant supports Sara Jordan at the Future of Privacy Forum (FPF) Education and Innovation Foundation, a strictly nonpartisan and nonprofit organization, who is developing a strategy to further accelerate corporate-academic data sharing. Grant funds provide continued support for the Foundation’s Award for Research Data Stewardship, allow Jordan to prepare compelling use cases to demonstrate how insights generated by administrative data can advance research and evidence-based policymaking, and also allow the creation of a legislative tracker producing real-time analysis to be shared with the research community. Combined, Jordan’s efforts accelerate the safe and responsible sharing of administrative data between companies and academic researchers.

    To accelerate the safe and responsible sharing of administrative data between companies and academic researchers

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