Grants Database

The Foundation awards approximately 200 grants per year (excluding the Sloan Research Fellowships), totaling roughly $80 million dollars in annual commitments in support of research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. This database contains grants for currently operating programs going back to 2008. For grants from prior years and for now-completed programs, see the annual reports section of this website.

Grants Database

Grantee
Amount
City
Year
  • grantee: Code for Science and Society
    amount: $699,936
    city: Portland, OR
    year: 2021

    To improve scientific collaboration by exploring opportunities for synchronous online discussion via the OpenReview platform

    • Program Technology
    • Initiative Virtual Collaboration initiative
    • Sub-program Exploratory Grantmaking in Technology
    • Investigator Andrew McCallum

    Virtual scholarly events usually involve some combination of videoconferencing and chat wrapped around a conference platform that manages the abstracts, papers, slides, and other material accompanying the live or recorded presentations. One such conference system is OpenReview, an open source software toolkit created by Andrew McCallum that has become the standard submission and review platform for many of the major academic conferences in artificial intelligence and adjacent fields.  User feedback about the platform over the past year has identified the importance of synchronous, realtime interaction at various phases of planning and holding events, interactions that are currently not well-supported by Open Review or its competitor platforms. Funds from this grant will allow McCallum to add synchronous discussion features to a set of points in the OpenReview conference workflow, from deliberations by reviewers and program committees to the actual talks given by presenters. Several event organizers are already lined up as testers and early adopters, from relatively small community workshops to the massive NeurIPS conference and the International Conference on Machine Learning.  All developed code will be made available in full on GitHub.

    To improve scientific collaboration by exploring opportunities for synchronous online discussion via the OpenReview platform

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  • grantee: University of California, Santa Cruz
    amount: $695,159
    city: Santa Cruz, CA
    year: 2021

    To pilot a postdoctoral fellowship on open source software development and support other activities at the University of California Santa Cruz Open Source Program Office

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Carlos Maltzahn

    Open Source Program Offices (OSPOs) are an organizational innovation developed initially by companies in the tech sector as a way to institutionalize support for open source software projects of strategic relevance to the business’s interests, market, and workforce.  The innovation has begun to be adopted by universities, with OSPOs being created as a useful formal mechanism for managing relationships with ecosystems of open source communities that play important roles in universities missions in research, teaching, and public service. Funds from this grant support an ambitious set of activities at the University of California at Santa Cruz to  transcend the scope of work undertaken by the existing Center for Research in Open Source Software (CROSS) and create a new university-wide OSPO. Led by Carlos Maltzahn and Stephanie Lieggi, the project team  plans to develop a “marketplace” of open source software projects across multiple UC campuses and associated national labs, create a postdoctoral “incubator fellowship” which will enable fellows to grow communities around their research prototypes, launch an undergraduate research experience program,  maintain a graduate student teaching fellowship focused on curricular innovation, and develop a better interface between the university and industry.  Taken together the initiative represents a significant increase in UC Santa Cruz’s ability to identify and support open source research efforts and will serve as a useful organizational model with the potential to be adopted more broadly across the academic landscape. The UC Santa Cruz OSPO will also explore expansion towards  a system-wide OSPO at the University of California.

    To pilot a postdoctoral fellowship on open source software development and support other activities at the University of California Santa Cruz Open Source Program Office

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  • grantee: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
    amount: $600,141
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2021

    To support policy engagement with open and low-cost hardware to accelerate innovation in and lower barriers to scientific research

    • Program Technology
    • Initiative Open Hardware
    • Sub-program Exploratory Grantmaking in Technology
    • Investigator Alison Parker

    Open hardware refers to the licensing of the design specifications of a physical object in such a way that the described object can be created, modified, used, or distributed by anyone. Open hardware sensors or other instruments present an attractive opportunity to expand the frontiers of scientific research by dramatically lowering the costs of instrumentation. They also present an attractive opportunity large-scale federal infrastructure projects. This grant supports Alison Parker at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, who is leading an effort to bring open hardware approaches to scale through government agencies. Parker’s team will engage federal audiences through workshops and roundtable discussions to stress the opportunities that are presented in pre-production, co-creation, customization, and collaboration through open processes. The team will also produce white papers exploring flagship programs within the U.S. government related to low-cost and open hardware, strategies for integration of low-cost and open hardware into federal investment in science through procurement and grants, legal analyses of intellectual property as a barrier to integration of low-cost and open hardware, and topical policy issues.

    To support policy engagement with open and low-cost hardware to accelerate innovation in and lower barriers to scientific research

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  • grantee: University of Missouri, Columbia
    amount: $50,000
    city: Columbia, MO
    year: 2021

    To support continued community maintenance of the Augur tool of the CHAOSS project

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Sean Goggins

    To support continued community maintenance of the Augur tool of the CHAOSS project

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  • grantee: Universiteit Leiden
    amount: $49,500
    city: Leiden, Netherlands, Netherlands
    year: 2021

    To partially support a workshop to consolidate knowledge and shape the future of hackathon research and practice

    • Program Technology
    • Initiative Virtual Collaboration initiative
    • Sub-program Exploratory Grantmaking in Technology
    • Investigator Linda Zwinkels

    To partially support a workshop to consolidate knowledge and shape the future of hackathon research and practice

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  • grantee: Arizona State University
    amount: $44,081
    city: Tempe, AZ
    year: 2021

    To partially support a community development workshop to improve the flexibility and interoperability of computational models

    • Program Technology
    • Sub-program Better Software for Science
    • Investigator Michael Barton

    To partially support a community development workshop to improve the flexibility and interoperability of computational models

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  • grantee: University of Puerto Rico, Cayey
    amount: $250,000
    city: Cayey, Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico
    year: 2021

    To enhance pathways for students in the UPR-Cayey science programs to enter STEM masters and doctoral graduate programs

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
    • Investigator Wilfredo Resto

    This grant supports a partnership between the University of Puerto Rico Cayey (UPRC; a Hispanic Serving Institution) and the University of Buffalo (UB) that seeks to develop sustainable pathways to graduate education in chemistry, a field wherein only 6.2% of 2018 Ph.D. recipients identified as Hispanic. Grant funds will allow UPRC to host an introductory seminar; select six participants for a 10-week summer research program at UB; provide research opportunities and mentoring for the six selected participants; and provide additional academic enrichment activities—all designed in collaboration with UB chemistry faculty—to provide students with the skills and training to pursue and succeed in graduate study. Students successfully completing the program will be offered admission into the UB graduate chemistry program.

    To enhance pathways for students in the UPR-Cayey science programs to enter STEM masters and doctoral graduate programs

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  • grantee: New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology
    amount: $74,905
    city: Socorro, NM
    year: 2021

    To generate transformative ideas that remove obstacles in minority student pathways to graduate school particularly in STEM areas with special focus on Native American students

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
    • Investigator Aly El-Osery

    This grant supports an emerging partnership between New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMT; a Hispanic Serving Institution) and Navajo Technical University (NTU; a Tribal University). The two institutions recently signed a memorandum of understanding to pursue a collaborative effort to bring safe, clean drinking water to Navajo households; demonstrating how these institutions go beyond serving students but serve their communities as well. Building on their research collaborations, the institutions now seek to develop a bridge into graduate programs for NTU students, with an emphasis on environmental science.  Grant funds allow the institutions to identify and establish a relationship with a mentor university; host a focus group at the American Indian Science and Engineering Society with other institutional leaders; facilitate surveys, interviews, and focus groups with students, alumni, and faculty to gain insights into systemic barriers that impede pathways to graduate education; facilitate interviews and focus groups with administrators to understand institutional priorities, plans, and goals; and formulate an action plan to implement change at each institution, including recommendations that will be presented to senior administrators.

    To generate transformative ideas that remove obstacles in minority student pathways to graduate school particularly in STEM areas with special focus on Native American students

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  • grantee: National Academy of Engineering
    amount: $149,965
    city: Washington, DC
    year: 2021

    To enable the planning subcommittee (established by NAE’s Racial Justice & Equity Committee) and NAE staff to conduct a literature review and landscape scan on five topical areas to identify collaborators and existing best practices

    • Program Higher Education
    • Sub-program Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in STEM Higher Education
    • Investigator Elizabeth Cady

    The urgency of the Black Lives Matter protests and ongoing attention to racial justice has moved many National Academies into action—including the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). This grant supports Elizabeth Cady who, along with Percy Pierre, is shepherding work at NAE’s Racial Justice & Equity (RJ&E) Committee. The Committee’s objectives are to achieve a diverse engineering population; reverse disappointing trends of decreasing college enrollment and degree completion in engineering over the last 10 years; provide access to successful careers in engineering through nontraditional routes; and provide the necessary tools both to retain underrepresented minorities in engineering and enable them to thrive. Grant funds will allow Cady and Pierre to commission, oversee, and disseminate a landscape scan and literature review focused on five topical areas (increased awareness of racial injustice and inequity; mentoring for minority engineering students and early-career minority engineers; nondegree training for high-tech positions; development of data and relationships to support machine learning algorithms; and efforts to increase the participation of minorities in engineering and technology); develop a framework for action informed by the landscape scan and literature review; and then use this framework to inform the ongoing work of the RJ&E Committee.

    To enable the planning subcommittee (established by NAE’s Racial Justice & Equity Committee) and NAE staff to conduct a literature review and landscape scan on five topical areas to identify collaborators and existing best practices

    More
  • grantee: Arizona State University
    amount: $250,000
    city: Tempe, AZ
    year: 2021

    To support the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC) in implementing a summer training program for early career scholars on the design of sustainable power systems

    • Program Research
    • Sub-program Energy and Environment
    • Investigator Kory Hedman

    To support the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC) in implementing a summer training program for early career scholars on the design of sustainable power systems

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